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December 31, 2010

Consistent exercise associated with lower risk of colon cancer death
Consistent exercise is associated with a lower risk of dying from colon cancer, according to a new study led by researchers at the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. The study is among the first to show that physical activity can make the disease less deadly.
Read article at physorg.com

December 21, 2010

Exercise and vitamin D help to prevent falls in seniors
A systematic review of over 50 clinical trials finds that exercise and Vitamin D supplements are the best ways to reduce the risk of falling in people aged 65 and over. The review is published in the December 21 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine and was commissioned by the US Preventive Services Task Force.
Read article at physorg.com

December 21, 2010

Prenatal micronutrient supplementation boosts children's cognition in Nepal
In developing countries where iron deficiency is prevalent, prenatal iron-folic acid supplementation increased offspring intellectual and motor functioning during school age, according to researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. They examined the intellectual and motor functioning of children whose mothers received micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy and found that aspects of intellectual functioning including working memory, inhibitory control, and fine motor functioning were positively associated with prenatal iron and folic acid supplementation. The results are published in the December 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Read article at physorg.com

December 20, 2010

Garlic may help protect against osteoarthritis: Study
A diet high in allium vegetables, such as garlic, onions and leeks, may help lower the risk osteoarthritis, according to new research from King's College London.
Read article at nutraingredients.org

December 17, 2010

Beetroot juice could help people live more active lives
New research into the health benefits of beetroot juice suggests it's not only athletes who can benefit from its performance enhancing properties – its physiological effects could help the elderly or people with heart or lung-conditions enjoy more active lives.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Other research on beetroot juice suggests it can promote brain health in older adults, boost performance and endurance during athletic activity, and significantly reduce blood pressure.

December 16, 2010

Supplements and sunlight give optimal protection from breast cancer: Study
Some sun exposure and vitamin D supplements may be the most effective means of reducing the risk of breast cancer, suggest findings from a French study.
Read article at nutraingredients.org

December 16, 2010

Folic Acid Found to Help Auditory Health
Presbycusis, also known as age-related hearing loss, occurs in most individuals as they grow older. The Deafness Research Foundation states that 30-35 percent of adults between the ages of 65 and 75 years and 40-50 percent of people 75 and older have presbycusis, with an estimated total of 28 million Americans suffering from presbycusis. Now a new study has found that folic acid may help auditory health.
Read article on the website of the Natural Health Research Institute (USA)

December 13, 2010

Polyphenols may reduce risk of gout: Study
Supplementation with highly bioavailable polyphenols may reduce the risk of developing gout by lowering levels of uric acid in the body, according to a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 12, 2010

Vitamin D cuts breast cancer risk by 43 pc
A new study has suggested that high levels of sunlight combined with a diet packed with Vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by 43 per cent.
Laboratory studies have suggested that Vitamin D may have a number of anti-cancer effects and has been shown to slow the spread of cancer cells. Researchers at the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health in France tracked 67,721 women aged 41 to 72 for a decade to see who developed breast cancer. Regions, where levels of daily ultraviolet were high, the women with higher level of Vitamin D had a breast cancer risk 32 to 43 per cent lower compared with those with the lowest vitamin intake.
Read article in The Times of India

December 9, 2010

Astaxanthin Found to Help Cell and Immune System Health in Women
Astaxanthin is one of the most common antioxidants found in the red pigment of crustacean shells (crabs, shrimp), and salmon. Now a new study has found that axtaxanthin can help benefit both cell and immune system health.
Read article on the website of the Natural Health Research Institute (USA)

December 8, 2010

Vitamin A could save one million lives per year, says review
Vitamin A supplementation programs in children under five should be continued in areas at risk of deficiency, according to a new review from the Cochrane Collaboration. The Cochrane researchers reviewed data from 43 randomized trials, representing more than 200,000 children aged six to five years. They concluded that vitamin A supplementation is effective in reducing all-cause mortality by 24 percent, mainly via a reduced occurrence of measles and diarrhea. “More than 190 million children are vitamin A deficient around the globe; reducing their risk of mortality by 24 percent could save almost 1 million lives per year,” said the researchers, led by Professor Zulfiqar Bhutta, Chairman of the Division of Women and Child Health at Aga Khan University, Pakistan.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 2, 2010

Omega 3 Rich Foods Protect Seniors From Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)
Seniors whose diets are rich in omega 3 fatty acids have a significantly lower risk of developing AMD (age-related macular degeneration) compared to other people of the same age, scientists revealed in the journal Ophthalmology.
Read article at medicalnewstoday.com

November 30, 2010

Everyone should boost intake of vitamin D, IOM says
The nation's top scientific advisory panel today recommended that adults modestly increase their intake of vitamin D, known as the "sunshine vitamin," from a daily dose of 200 international units to 600 international units. The panel also extended the safe upper limit for adults from 2000 IU to 4000 IU daily. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report was released this morning in Washington, D.C., after two years of study and debate.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: With a huge part of the American population now known to be deficient in vitamin D, and most people globally getting insufficient amounts, the decision of the U.S. Institute of Medicine to increase its recommended intake is undoubtedly a step in the right direction. However, it is important to understand that it is not the intake of any one single nutrient that ensures full health, but the intake of a complete spectrum of various different micronutrients, including vitamins, minerals, amino acids and trace elements. This is why the approach of Dr. Rath and Dr. Aleksandra Niedzwiecki at the Dr. Rath Research Institute concentrates upon the concept of nutrient synergy, a methodology which maximizes the health benefits of micronutrients because of the discovery they work best in "teams". The results of the studies carried out at the Dr. Rath Research Institute have repeatedly shown that utilizing a nutrient synergy-based approach is the most effective method of optimizing cellular metabolism and restoring its balance, and that this approach is significantly more effective than using either individual nutrients, or their random combination.

November 29, 2010

The Alternative Approach: Vitamin K May Help in Treating Osteoarthritis
We know that eating green vegetables is good for health, but it might also be an important factor in the prevention of arthritis of the knee. Recent medical research suggested that vitamin K, found in leafy, green vegetables, has a significant role in the prevention of osteoarthritis.
Read article on the website of the Natural Health Research Institute (USA)

November 29, 2010

Magnesium reduces sudden heart failure risk for women: Harvard study
Increased intakes of magnesium-rich foods are associated with a reduced risk of sudden cardiac death, says new research from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. The highest dietary intakes of the mineral were associated with a 37 percent reduction in the risk of sudden cardiac death, compared with the lowest average intakes, according to new findings published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The apparent protective effects of magnesium were strongest when the researchers focused their attention on blood levels, with every 0.25 milligram per deciliter increase associated with a 41 percent reduction in the risk of sudden cardiac death.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.org

November 25, 2010

Cinnamon’s anti-diabetes benefits get clinical trial boost
A daily dose of two grams of cinnamon for 12 weeks may improve blood pressure measures and blood sugar levels in people with type-2 diabetes, says new research from Imperial College London.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.org

November 23, 2010

High alpha-carotene levels linked to longer life: Study
High blood levels of the carotenoid alpha-carotene may reduce the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, and all other causes by up to 39 percent, suggest results from a 14 year study.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: To read the abstract for this study, click here.

November 20, 2010

Study Sees Link Between Low Salt Levels, Fracture Risk in Older Adults
New research links lower-than-normal levels of sodium (salt) in the blood to a higher risk of broken bones and falls in older adults. Even mildly decreased levels of sodium can cause problems, the researchers contend. "Screening for a low sodium concentration in the blood, and treating it when present, may be a new strategy to prevent fractures," study co-author Dr. Ewout J. Hoorn, of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, said in a news release from the American Society of Nephrology.
Read article at health.usnews.com
Comment: Research has shown that 20% of patients taking diuretics, a class of drugs commonly prescribed for high blood pressure or heart conditions, end up with reduced sodium and potassium levels. Despite this, however, evidence suggests that perhaps as few as a third of patients on these drugs have their levels of these minerals tested – despite the fact that reduced levels are well known to lead to a wide range of health problems. To learn how high blood pressure can be eradicated naturally, without the use of diuretics, click here.

November 19, 2010

Antioxidants may reduce inflammatory effects of Alzheimer’s: Study
Consuming an antioxidant-rich beverage may reduce levels of the amino acid homocysteine, and counter the detrimental inflammatory effects associated with Alzheimer’s disease, suggests a new study. Daily consumption of the antioxidant-rich drink for eight months was associated with a smaller increase in homocysteine levels, compared with the placebo group, and the effects were even more significant in people with moderate Alzeimer’s disease, according to findings published in the Journal of the Neurological Sciences.
Read article at nutraingredients.org

November 19, 2010

Eating a variety of fruit cuts lung cancer risk
Eating five portions of fruit and vegetables per day is one of the means that experts most frequently recommend for preventing cancer. Now, the European EPIC study carried out by researchers from 10 countries has shown that, in the case of lung cancer, the important thing is not just the quantity but also the variety of fruit consumed, which can reduce the risk by up to 23%.
Read article at physorg.com

November 19, 2010

Pomegranate juice may reduce kidney dialysis complications: Study
Pomegranate juice may reduce complications in kidney disease patients on dialysis, including the high morbidity rate due to infections and cardiovascular events, according to a preliminary study. The study suggests that 12 months consumption of pomegranate juice “has a continuous, accumulative, beneficial effect for dialysis patients.” The researchers found that pomegranate juice consumption yields a lower level of oxidative stress, reduced inflammation, an improvement in lipid profile, and reductions in blood pressure.
Read article at nutraingredients.org

November 17, 2010

Aged garlic shows blood pressure improvement benefits: Study
Daily supplements of an aged garlic extract may reduce systolic blood pressure by 10.2 mmHg, suggests new data from Australia.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 16, 2010

Rare genetic disorder highlights importance of selenium
A rare genetic disorder has highlighted the importance to human health of selenium, a little known trace element.
Read article at physorg.com

November 15, 2010

Calcium plus vit D effective for bone density boost: Study
Combined supplements of vitamin D and calcium are effective for increasing the bone mineral density of post-menopausal women, even when calcium intakes are adequate, says a new study from Finland. The bone mineral density (BMD) of post-menopausal women increased significantly more when they received daily doses of 800 International Units of vitamin D (cholocalciferol) and 1,000 milligrams of calcium for three years, compared with women who received no intervention.
Read article at nutraingredients.org

November 15, 2010

Regular exercise reduces large number of health risks including dementia and some cancers
People who take regular exercise could reduce their risk of developing around two dozen physical and mental health conditions - including some cancers and dementia - and slow down how quickly their body deteriorates as they age.
Read article at physorg.com

November 12, 2010

Liquorice root may protect brain cells
A neuroscientist at the University of South Carolina is conducting research on a compound found in liquorice root that could prevent or slow down the cell death associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
Read article at physorg.com

November 9, 2010

Exercise may reduce risk of endometrial cancer
Women who exercise for 150 minutes a week or more may see a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, despite whether or not they are overweight, according to data presented at the Ninth Annual AACR Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held here Nov. 7-10, 2010. "This study is consistent with other studies that strongly support the association between physical activity and lower risk of endometrial cancer," said Hannah Arem, a doctoral student at Yale School of Public Health.
Read article at physorg.com

November 8, 2010

DHA improves memory and cognitive function in older adults
A study published in the November edition of Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association suggests that taking docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may improve memory and learning in older adults with mild cognitive impairments.
Read article at esciencenews.com

November 4, 2010

Sufficient Vitamin D Boosts Leukemia Survival
Patients with insufficient levels of vitamin D when diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) progressed much faster and were about twice as likely to die as were patients with adequate levels of vitamin D, according to a new study published online the journal Blood. Researchers at Mayo Clinic found increasing vitamin D levels across patients matched longer survival times and decreasing levels matched shortening intervals between diagnosis and cancer progression.
Read article at foodproductdesign.com

November 2, 2010

Daily dose of beet juice promotes brain health in older adults
Researchers for the first time have shown that drinking beet juice can increase blood flow to the brain in older adults – a finding that could hold great potential for combating the progression of dementia.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Other research suggests drinking beetroot juice could boost performance and endurance during athletic activity and significantly reduce blood pressure.

November 1, 2010

Daily exercise helps keep the sniffles away
Regular exercise can improve your mood, help you lose weight, and add years to your life. Still need another reason to hit the gym? A new study suggests that working out regularly helps ward off colds and flu. In the study, researchers followed a group of about 1,000 adults of all ages for 12 weeks during the winter and fall of 2008. During that time, people who logged at least 20 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise—such as jogging, biking, or swimming—on five or more days per week were sick with cold or flu symptoms for just five days, on average, compared with about 8.5 days among people who exercised one day per week or less. What's more, regular exercisers tended to have milder symptoms when they were ill.
Read article at cnn.com

October 29, 2010

B-vitamins ease depression among stroke victims
Victims of stroke who regularly take B-vitamins are better able to combat depression. Researchers demonstrated for the first time that they could reduce the risk of depressive symptoms after stroke with the help of vitamins, said Osvaldo Almeida, research director at The Western Australian Centre for Health and Ageing. “Previous work had suggested that certain vitamins could have a role in preventing depression,” the journal Annals of Neurology quoted Almeida as saying. “However, we found that the stroke survivors who took daily folic acid, vitamin B6 and B12 were half as likely to become depressed,” according to a statement of The Western Australian Centre.
Read article in The Hindu (India)

October 28, 2010

Americans with 'phytonutrient gap' fall short in nutrients that may support immune health
The majority of Americans report getting a cold or flu in the past year, and more than a third say they'll make lifestyle changes to prevent getting sick again this year. However, 40 percent of Americans don't plan to take what is arguably the easiest and tastiest step to help potentially prevent illness this cold and flu season – eat more fruits and vegetables daily. According to a newly released report, America's Phytonutrient Report: Immune Health by Color, American adults who fall short in meeting their recommended daily fruit and vegetable intakes, are also likely to fall short in vitamins A, C, and E, zinc and selenium, all nutrients research suggests may support a healthy immune system.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: As this article describes, one way to increase intake of phytonutrients and nutrients associated with immune function is to take plant-based supplements. To read studies on the health benefits of phytobiologicals, visit the phytobiologicals.com website.

October 26, 2010

Consuming polyunsaturated fatty acids may lower the incidence of gum disease
Periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease in which gum tissue separates from teeth, leads to accumulation of bacteria and potential bone and tooth loss. Although traditional treatments concentrate on the bacterial infection, more recent strategies target the inflammatory response. In an article in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, researchers from Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health found that dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) like fish oil, known to have anti-inflammatory properties, shows promise for the effective treatment and prevention of periodontitis.
Read article at physorg.com

October 26, 2010

Bicarbonate adds fizz to players' tennis performance
Dietary supplementation with sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) on the morning of a tennis match allows athletes to maintain their edge. A randomized, controlled trial reported in BioMed Central's open access Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition found that those players who received the supplement showed no decline in skilled tennis performance after a simulated match.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Other research carried out by British scientists shows that a daily dose of sodium bicarbonate could dramatically slow the progress of chronic kidney disease and help patients avoid having to undergo dialysis.

October 22, 2010

Vitamin D Has Retinopathy Link
CHICAGO -- Diabetic retinopathy may be added to the list of conditions potentially related to vitamin D insufficiency, a researcher said here. A study of 123 diabetic individuals with varying degrees of retinopathy, along with two groups of controls, showed that low vitamin D levels were significantly more common in those with the diabetic complication, according to John F. Payne, MD, of Emory University in Atlanta. In a poster presentation here at the American Academy of Ophthalmology's annual meeting, Payne also reported that multivitamin use appeared to be helpful in preventing vitamin D insufficiency -- at least as currently defined. "If you were taking a daily multivitamin, your mean vitamin D [25-hydroxyvitamin D] was about 31 [ng/mL] versus about 22 if you weren't taking a multivitamin," he told MedPage Today. Because 30 ng/mL was the cutoff Payne and colleagues had used to define insufficiency, "now you're up to the optimum level."
Read article at medpagetoday.com

October 21, 2010

How Doctors Use (Or Should Use) Vitamin Therapy
Numerous letters to the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service come from readers wanting to know exactly how to use nutritional therapy for a specific disease. Since we cannot answer such emails personally, we wanted to provide some highly useful resources for our readers' benefit. We suggest that you print these documents out and take them to your doctor.
Read news release at orthomolecular.org

October 18, 2010

Vitamin B12 may reduce risk of Alzheimer's disease
A new study shows that vitamin B12 may protect against Alzheimer's disease, adding more evidence to the scientific debate about whether the vitamin is effective in reducing the risk of memory loss. The research will be published in the October 19, 2010, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Read article at physorg.com

October 14, 2010

Multivitamin use linked to fewer heart attacks for women
Women who take a daily multivitamin may be at a reduced risk of heart attacks, according to new research. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, observed multivitamin use to be inversely associated with myocardial infarction in women with no history of cardiovascular disease.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: By confirming that multivitamins reduce the risk of heart attacks, this study provides further clinical support for the findings of the Dr. Rath Research Institute and proves that Dr. Rath has been right all along. To read the abstract for this study, click here.

October 14, 2010

Pine bark extract may relieve tinnitus symptoms: Study
Daily supplements of French maritime pine bark extract may ease tinnitus, a result that offers hope to the estimated 15m Americans who consider their tinnitus to be a serious problem. According to findings published in the peer-review journal Panminerva Medica, daily supplements of the branded ingredient Pycnogenol may improve blood flow to the inner ear and therefore relieve tinnitus symptoms.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

October 13, 2010

Study finds watermelon lowers blood pressure
No matter how you slice it, watermelon has a lot going for it –– sweet, low calorie, high fiber, nutrient rich –– and now, there’s more. Evidence from a pilot study led by food scientists at The Florida State University suggests that watermelon can be an effective natural weapon against prehypertension, a precursor to cardiovascular disease. It is the first investigation of its kind in humans. FSU Assistant Professor Arturo Figueroa and Professor Bahram H. Arjmandi found that six grams of watermelon extract a day for six weeks increased aortic blood flow and consequently lowered blood pressure in all nine of their prehypertensive subjects (four men and five postmenopausal women, ages 51-57).
Read article at physorg.com

October 12, 2010

Passion fruit peel extract may improve knee health
Extracts from the peel of purple passion fruit may reduce measures of pain and stiffness in people suffering from knee osteoarthritis, says a new randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Writing in Nutrition Research, scientists from Iran, the USA, and New Zealand report that, according to scores on the widely accepted WOMAC scale, 60 days of supplementation with the passion fruit peel extract reduced pain and stiffness of the knees by about 18 percent.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

October 11, 2010

B vitamin may protect pilots’ DNA from damage
Increased intakes of niacin (vitamin B3) from the diet may protect against DNA damage in people exposed to ionizing radiation such as pilots, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: The researchers say that their findings may be applicable not only to airline flight crews and astronauts in space flights, but also to frequent flyers in the general population. Other research, meanwhile, suggests that increased intakes of vitamins C and E and other antioxidants may similarly protect against DNA damage in people exposed to ionizing radiation.

October 6, 2010

Herbal remedies for anxiety found
Two herbal remedies used for centuries to alleviate anxiety have won the backing of scientists. Researchers found "strong evidence" that passion flower extract and kava both combat anxiety disorders. Pooled results from an analysis of 24 studies involving more than 2,000 participants also indicated that combinations of the amino acids L-lysine and L-arginine may be useful anxiety remedies.
Read UK Press Association news report at google.com

October 5, 2010

Coconut Oil and Alzheimer’s Disease
How worried should drug companies be about supplements eating into their monopoly profits? A lot—as this story will show. Please share it with anyone you know who is suffering from Alzheimer’s or is worried about it.
Read article on the Alliance for Natural Health (USA) website

October 4, 2010

Are we getting enough vitamin D?
Researchers at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR) are on a mission to find out if we need to supplement our diet with vitamin D. According to lead researcher, Dr Rachel Neale from QIMR, “There has been increasing scientific and media attention paid to the potential health benefits vitamin D, known as the sunshine vitamin. Adequate vitamin D levels are essential for maintaining good bone health. It may have other potential health benefits such as prevention of heart disease, colon, lung and several other cancers, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia and diabetes among others.”
Read article at physorg.com

October 4, 2010

Exercise may reduce Alzheimer's disease brain changes
Walking, jogging and other forms of regular aerobic exercise may actually ward off the onset of Alzheimer’s disease pathology in the brain, suggests newly published research from Washington University in St. Louis.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Research is increasingly showing that, contrary to popular belief, there are things we can do to help prevent and treat Alzheimer’s and other forms of cognitive impairment. In addition to being more physically active and adhering to a Mediterranean-type diet, for example, taking micronutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids have also been shown to be helpful. To read an overview of the most recent research and clinical studies about the health benefits of micronutrients in fighting Alzheimer's disease, click here.

October 4, 2010

Walnuts, walnut oil, improve reaction to stress
A diet rich in walnuts and walnut oil may prepare the body to deal better with stress, according to a team of Penn State researchers who looked at how these foods, which contain polyunsaturated fats, influence blood pressure at rest and under stress. Previous studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids -- like the alpha linolenic acid found in walnuts and flax seeds -- can reduce low density lipoproteins (LDL) -- bad cholesterol. These foods may also reduce c-reactive protein and other markers of inflammation.
Read article at physorg.com

October 2, 2010

Beet juice amps endurance during exercise
LONDON -- Experts said drinking beetroot juice could boost your performance and endurance during athletic activity. Exeter University researchers gave 15 male cyclists either beetroot juice or a placebo before a bike trip. Those who drank the beet juice could ride up to 20 percent longer.
Read article on the KABC-TV website (Los Angeles, USA)

October 2, 2010

Vigorous exercise reduces breast cancer risk in African-American women
Vigorous exercise of more than two hours per week reduces the risk of developing breast cancer in postmenopausal African-American women by 64 percent, compared to women of the same race who do not exercise, according to researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Read article at physorg.com

September 29, 2010

The cure for lung cancer may be in fish oil
High doses of omega-3 fatty acids found in oily fish or fish oil or plant sources may help fight lung cancer, according to a case report published by researchers at the University of Nevada in the journal Nutrition and Cancer. Ron Pardini, biochemistry professor of the Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station and colleagues helped his neighbor "D.H." with terminal lung cancer defeat his disease, which doctors said would kill the 78 year-old man in a few months. With high doses of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and low intake of omega-6 fatty acid known as linoleic acid, D.H. was still alive five years later at the time the report was published.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

September 29, 2010

Exercise could cut womb cancer risk by 30 percent
Women who regularly work up a sweat exercising have a 30 percent lower risk of developing endometrial cancer, a new study says. Researchers at the United States' National Cancer Institute analyzed 14 previous studies and found physical activity cuts the risk of endometrial cancer by 20 to 40 percent when compared to sedentary women.
Read article at physorg.com

September 23, 2010

Vitamin C rapidly improves emotional state of acutely hospitalized patients, researchers say
Treatment with vitamin C rapidly improves the emotional state of acutely hospitalized patients, according to a study carried out by researchers at Montreal's Jewish General Hospital (JGH) and the affiliated Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research (LDI).
Read article at physorg.com

September 22, 2010

Omega-3 may improve cardio measures in overweight teens: Study
Daily supplements of the omega-3s EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) may improve blood pressure levels in slightly overweight teenage boys.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 20, 2010

Review supports antioxidants for fertility, sperm quality
Antioxidant supplements, including vitamins C and E and selenium, may improve sperm quality and pregnancy rates, according to a systematic review of evidence. Evidence from randomized controlled trials was found to support a link between antioxidant supplementation and improvements in male fertility linked to sperm quality, according to a review published in Reproductive BioMedicine Online.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

September 15, 2010

Eating broccoli could guard against arthritis
Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) are launching a groundbreaking new project to investigate the benefits of broccoli in the fight against osteoarthritis. Initial laboratory research at UEA has found that a compound in broccoli called sulforaphane blocks the enzymes that cause joint destruction in osteoarthritis - the most common form of arthritis. Broccoli has previously been associated with reduced cancer risk but this is the first major study into its effects on joint health.       
Read article at physorg.com

September 13, 2010

Blueberries show anti-diabetic potential: Study
A daily smoothie containing bioactive ingredients from blueberry increased sensitivity to insulin, and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk people, says a new study. Obese, non-diabetic, and insulin-resistant participants who consumed a blueberry smoothie daily for six weeks experienced a 22 percent change in insulin sensitivity, compared to only 4.9 percent in the placebo group, state findings published in the Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: Additional research suggests that blueberries can improve cardiovascular health; counteract intestinal diseases; boost memory in older adults; increase attention span and reverse memory loss.

September 13, 2010

ACE vitamins may reduce colon cancer risk: Study
Supplementation with vitamins A, C, and E is “strongly associated” with lower levels of colon cancer, according to a new study. The research, published in the journal Cancer Causes Control, claims that supplementation with multivitamins, especially those containing vitamins A, C, E, and folate are linked to lower risks of colon cancer. “Total intakes of vitamins A, C, and E were associated with 24–30 percent lower risks of colon cancer…,” wrote the researchers, led by Dr. Stephanie Smith-Warner, associate professor of nutritional epidemiology at Harvard Medical School.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

September 10, 2010

Folic Acid and Vitamin B12 May Help with Digestive Inflammation
Inflammatory bowel disease is an inflammatory condition of the intestines that has no known cause, but is thought to involve an immune reaction of the body to its own intestinal lining. There are two forms of inflammatory bowel disease: ulcerative colitis (UC), which is limited to the colon, and Crohn’s Disease (CD), which can involve any part of the digestive system.  It is estimated that over one million Americans suffer from either UC or CD. Now a new study has found that folic acid and vitamin B12 may help with the inflammation that characterizes inflammatory bowel disease, especially in Crohn’s disease patients.
Read article at naturalhealthresearch.org

September 9, 2010

Vitamin 'may help prevent' spina bifida
Scientists have begun a study to determine if an everyday vitamin supplement could help prevent one of Britain's most common birth defects. Every year about 100 children in the UK are born with spina bifida and other neural tube defects.
Prospective mothers are advised to take folic acid as a way of preventing the condition. However, scientists think the vitamin inositol, taken with folic acid, may be more effective at preventing defects.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

September 9, 2010

Omega-3, vitamins C and E may boost pancreatic health
Increased intakes of omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamins C and E may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer by over 30 percent, suggests new research. Data from residents in the San Francisco Bay Area found that consuming at least 850 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids per day was associated with a 53 percent reduction in the risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to intakes of between 330 and 580 milligrams per day. According to findings published in the International Journal of Cancer, benefits were also observed for intakes of vitamin C and E, the highest average intakes associated with 31 and 33 percent reductions, respectively, compared with the lowest average intakes.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.org

September 8, 2010

Vitamin B treatment could delay onset of Alzheimer's – study
Vitamin B could prove to be a revolutionary weapon against age-related memory loss and Alzheimer's, the results of a groundbreaking study suggest. The research showed that large daily doses of B vitamins can halve the rate of brain shrinkage in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a precursor to Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Brain atrophy, which is a natural part of ageing, is known to happen faster in people with MCI who go on to develop Alzheimer's. The British-led scientists believe the vitamin treatment could delay or even prevent development of the disease.
Read article in the Yorkshire Evening Post (UK)
Comment: Briefing journalists in London, Professor David Smith, one of the study leaders, admitted it had been difficult to get the findings published because they challenged conventional thinking. "Dogma is so strong in science, and there's money involved, lets face it," he explained. Significantly, therefore, when asked if he would choose vitamin treatment if he was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, he confessed: "Yes, no hesitation. I would take it." Smith’s confidence in his findings echoes that of John Hough, one of the elderly patients who took part in the trial. Speaking in the UK’s Daily Mirror newspaper, 80-year-old Hough, who, following the end of the study, has resumed taking large doses of B vitamins, said that his personal experience of using the supplements backs the study findings. To read the study, click here

September 8, 2010

Swine flu milder than seasonal flu, vitamin D helps prevent both
A new study in the September 8 issue of Journal of American Medical Association suggests that the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus H1N1 had lower risk of most serious complications compared to recent seasonal flu strains. Another study suggests vitamin D can be better than influenza vaccine at preventing flu.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

September 8, 2010

More calcium and vitamin D may aid weight management
Increasing intakes of calcium and higher blood levels of vitamin D may boost weight loss, suggest findings from a two-year clinical trial. Average calcium intakes of 580 milligrams per day and blood levels of vitamin D of 30.2 nanograms per milliliter were associated with 5.3 kg weight loss over the two years of intervention, according to findings published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Lower calcium intakes of just 156 milligrams and blood levels of vitamin D of 14.5 nanograms per milliliter were also associated with improvements in body weight (loss of 3.3 kilograms over two years).
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

September 7, 2010

Low vitamin D linked to schizophrenia
Babies born with low vitamin D levels are twice as likely to develop schizophrenia later in life, researchers from the Queensland Brain Institute have found. But the researchers say the good news from the study is that it suggests it may be possible to prevent schizophrenia, which affects almost 200,000 Australians.
Read article on the website of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)
Comment: The lead author of this study, Professor John McGrath from the Queensland Brain Institute, says vitamin D supplements may prove an effective way to prevent schizophrenia. To read the study abstract, click here

September 3, 2010

Small babies need iron supplements, say Swedish researchers
Recommendations should change so that babies born with marginally low birth weight received iron supplements, suggests new research from Sweden. Marginally low birth weight babies who received iron supplements up to the age of 6 months did not develop iron deficiency or anaemia, according to findings published in the journal Pediatrics.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 3, 2010

Green tea may protect DNA from damage: Human study
Drinking green tea every day for a month may protect against damage at a genetic levels, with benefits linked to the beverage’s antioxidant content, says a new study. Combined results from a human supplementation trial and an in vitro study indicated a 20 percent reduction in levels of DNA damage, while measures of whole-body oxidative stress were unaffected, say findings published in the British Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: Research is increasingly showing that phytobiologics such as extracts from green tea are of great significance for the protection and healthy function of our body cells. To access key studies on green tea extracts and other health-promoting plant compounds, visit the phytobiologicals.com website.

September 2, 2010

Daily fish oils could save lives of 10,000 heart patients
Fish oils could save the lives of 10,000 heart failure sufferers every year, research has shown, and be prescribed as part of their daily treatment. A study found that people with heart failure, where the organ fails to beat with sufficient force, were less likely to die if they took fish oils.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: This scientific review found that people with chronic heart failure who took 1 gram of fish oil capsules per day had a nine per cent reduction in deaths after two years. Taking the fish oils also resulted in a cut in hospital admissions. To read the review, click here.

August 30, 2010

Increasing selenium intake may decrease bladder cancer risk
A common mineral may provide protection against bladder cancer. According to results of a study published in the September issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, selenium intake is associated with decreased risk of bladder cancer. "The lower the levels of selenium, the higher the risk of developing bladder cancer," said lead researcher Núria Malats, M.D., Ph.D., leader of the Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Human Cancer Genetics Program, Spanish National Cancer Research Center.
Read article at physorg.com

August 30, 2010

Fruit and veg supplements show promise against common cold
Concentrated fruit and veg juice in supplement form may reduce common cold symptoms in individuals who regularly come into contact with patients, indicates a new study from Germany.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 30, 2010

Diverse diet of veggies may decrease lung cancer risk
Adding a variety of vegetables to one’s diet may help decrease the chance of getting lung cancer, and adding a variety of fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of squamous cell lung cancer, especially among smokers. Study results are published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
Read article at physorg.com

August 26, 2010

Supplement produces a 'striking' endurance boost
Research from the University of Exeter has revealed taking a dietary supplement to boost nitric oxide in the body can significantly boost stamina during high-intensity exercise. The study has important implications for athletes, as results suggest that taking the supplement can allow people to exercise up to 20% longer and could produce a 1-2% improvement in race times. This comes on the back of previous research from Exeter which showed that the high nitrate content of beetroot juice, which also boosts nitric oxide in the body, has a similar effect on performance.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: The study, published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, found that taking a supplement containing the amino acid L-arginine improves severe-intensity exercise endurance by 20%, significantly reduces systolic blood pressure and reduces the oxygen cost of exercise.

August 25, 2010

Cinnamon extract may reduce diabetes
A water soluble extract of cinnamon, which contains antioxidative compounds, could help reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and heart disease, suggests a new study.
Read article in The Times of India

August 24, 2010

Sunshine remedy vitamin D keeps diseases at bay
Stocking up on vitamin D supplements and enjoying the summer sun could cut the risk of a host of diseases. An Oxford University study has linked the vitamin, which is made when our skin is exposed to sunlight, to the activity of more than 200 genes in the body. Some of these genes are already known to raise the odds of multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, dementia and some cancers. Boosting levels of the vitamin could keep illness at bay, said the researchers.
Read article in the Daily Mail (UK)

August 23, 2010

Eating berries may activate the brain's natural housekeeper for healthy aging
Scientists today reported the first evidence that eating blueberries, strawberries, and acai berries may help the aging brain stay healthy in a crucial but previously unrecognized way. Their study, presented at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), concluded that berries, and possibly walnuts, activate the brain's natural "housekeeper" mechanism, which cleans up and recycles toxic proteins linked to age-related memory loss and other mental decline.
Read article at physorg.com

August 23, 2010

New evidence on how cranberry juice fights bacteria that cause urinary tract infections
Scientists today reported new scientific evidence on the effectiveness of that old folk remedy -- cranberry juice -- for urinary tract infections, at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held this week. "A number of controlled clinical trials -- these are carefully designed and conducted scientific studies done in humans -- have concluded that cranberry juice really is effective for preventing urinary tract infections," said Terri Anne Camesano, Ph.D., who led the study. "That has important implications, considering the size of the problem and the health care costs involved."
Read article at physorg.com

August 20, 2010

Eat your greens to beat diabetes
Eating plenty of greens can protect against diabetes, claim scientists. A study of 220,000 people found those who ate one and a half extra servings of leafy vegetables daily cut by 14 per cent the risk of developing the condition. Researchers say the key is in high levels of magnesium, essential to the body, in the likes of spinach.
Read article in the Daily Express (UK)

August 19, 2010

Sweet pepper compounds show weight management power
Capsinoids, non-pungent compounds in sweet pepper, may boost energy use by promoting the use of fat as the energy source, suggests a new study from Canada. A daily 10 milligram dose of purified capsinoids increased energy use by 20 percent, according to findings from scientists from the Exercise Metabolism Research Group at McMaster University.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 18, 2010

Omega-3s could improve metabolic syndrome outcomes
Omega-3-rich supplements may improve blood lipid levels of people with metabolic syndrome, reducing the risks of developing serious health problems, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

August 13, 2010

Vitamin D May Help Protect Against Parkinson’s
Parkinson Disease (PD), characterized by tremors, slowness of movement, stiffness, and difficulty with balance, affects more than 1.5 million Americans, with 60,000 new cases each year. The combined direct and indirect costs of PD are estimated at more than $5.6 billion per year in the U.S. With medication costs for an individual patient averaging $2,500 a year, and therapeutic surgery costing up to $100,000 dollars per patient prevention of PD is at a premium. Now a new study has found that maintaining proper blood levels of vitamin D may help lower the risk of Parkinson’s.
Read article at naturalhealthresearch.org

August 10, 2010

Scientists call for global policy change on vitamin D
International experts have again called out for an increase in daily recommendations for Vitamin D, which they say is crucial to reduce the risk of a host a diseases. The latest call comes from scientists in Europe and the US, who say that higher intake levels of the vitamin could help protect against conditions such as childhood rickets, adult osteomalacia, cancer, autoimmune type-1 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, obesity and muscle weakness. Writing in the July 28 issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine, the authors propose worldwide policy changes to increase recommended intake levels of the sunshine vitamin. This, they said, would reduce the frequency of certain diseases, increase longevity and reduce medical costs.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 10, 2010

Adequate zinc eases pneumonia in elderly
A high proportion of nursing facility residents were found to have low serum (blood) zinc concentrations during an observational study funded by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the National Institute of Aging. The scientists found that those with normal blood zinc concentrations were about 50 percent less likely to develop pneumonia than those with low concentrations. The study was led by Simin Nikbin Meydani, director of the Nutritional Immunology Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University in Boston, Mass.
Read article at physorg.com

August 9, 2010

Astaxanthin’s heart benefits get human data support
Daily supplements of the carotenoid astaxanthin may improve HDL ‘good’ cholesterol levels in people with mildly abnormal blood lipid levels, suggests new data from a human trial. Doses up to 18 milligrams per day for 12 weeks improved blood levels of HDL cholesterol, as well as adiponectin concentrations, a protein hormone linked to various metabolic processes, according to findings published in Atherosclerosis.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 5, 2010

Zinc Found to Help Digestive Health in Children
The World Health Organization estimates there are 1.5 billion episodes of diarrhea in children younger than 5 years of age in the developing world, accounting for 3 million deaths. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most frequently isolated enteropathogen, accounting for approximately 210 million diarrhoea episodes and approximately 380,000 deaths annually. When it comes to ways to help prevent ETEC infections for the entire population, arguments have been made for an ETEC vaccine that would have the potential to cost as little as $17 per dose. Past research has shown that zinc reduces the risk of diarrhea by 23% and also reduces the risk of severe diarrhea by 37% in children after zinc supplementation. These results have resulted in recommendations by the World Health Organization of 20 mg of zinc per day for 10-14 days for children with diarrhea. Now a new study has suggested just how zinc is able to maintain digestive health in children.
Read article at naturalhealthresearch.org

August 5, 2010

Some evidence vitamin D might fight colds
A daily vitamin D supplement may help young men enjoy more sick-free days during cold and flu season, a small study suggests.
Read news report at reuters.com

August 4, 2010

Vitamin E and Omega-3 Fats May Help with Speech
Apraxia of speech is a speech disorder in which a person has trouble saying what he or she wants to say correctly and consistently. Also known as verbal apraxia or dyspraxia, apraxia of speech is not caused by muscle weakness of the face, tongue or lips, but is centered in the processing centers of the brain. The two types of speech apraxia are acquired (affecting persons of any age, but is frequently seen after strokes) and developmental (being present at birth). Developmental apraxia seems to affect boys more than girls and is a common symptom in children diagnosed with ADHD and autism. With rates of ADHD and autism continuing to rise at alarming rates (one hospital study found a quadrupling of diagnosis between 1989 and 2000), verbal apraxia rates are almost certain to increase as well. Symptoms of children with verbal apraxia include not cooing as an infant, beginning to speak late, struggling to combine sounds, and even having problems eating. A 2007 report from Nationwide Children’s Hospital has found that apraxia is continuing to increase and may affect as many as 1 in 100 children. Now a new study has suggested that vitamin E and omega-3 fats may help with speech.
Read article at naturalhealthresearch.org

August 3, 2010

Fit heart can slow brain ageing, US researchers say
Keeping your heart fit and strong can slow down the ageing of your brain, US researchers say. A Boston University team found healthy people with sluggish hearts that pumped out less blood had "older" brains on scans than others.
Read article on BBC News (UK)

July 30, 2010

Calcium supplements play an important role in maintaining bone health
A broad range of scientific research has demonstrated that an adequate intake of calcium plays an important role in building and maintaining optimum bone mass, and a recent meta-analysis published online in the British Medical Journal should not cause consumers to doubt the value of calcium supplements for maintaining bone health.
Read article at physorg.com

July 29, 2010

Plant compound resveratrol shown to suppress inflammation, free radicals in humans
Resveratrol, a popular plant extract shown to prolong life in yeast and lower animals due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, appears also to suppress inflammation in humans, based on results from the first prospective human trial of the extract conducted by University at Buffalo endocrinologists.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: To access research studies on the health benefits of resveratrol and other plant extracts, click here.

July 29, 2010

Vitamin D deficiency linked to arterial stiffness in black teens
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with arterial stiffness, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, in black teens according to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's JCEM. Black teens taking vitamin D supplementation of 2,000 international units (IU) per day had a decrease in central arterial stiffness.
Read article at physorg.com

July 22, 2010

Vitamins needed to help celiacs stave off bone disease
Children with celiac disease need to include certain must-have vitamins in their diets to stave off weak bones and osteoporosis, say researchers at the University of Alberta. A study of 43 children and teens from three to 18 years of age diagnosed with celiac disease showed that they also tended to have low bone density, likely due to poor intake and absorption of vitamins and minerals. That means they should be getting more of bone-boosting vitamins such as K and D in their diets, says Diana Mager, a professor of agricultural, food and nutritional science at the U of A, and one of the researchers on the project.
Read article at physorg.com

July 20, 2010

Vitamin C blocks tumour growth: study
New Zealand researchers have established that vitamin C can help to block the growth of cancer cells - an important experimental finding they expect could be quickly adopted into cancer treatment.
Read article in the New Zealand Herald (New Zealand)
Comment: Along with the New York Times’ July 26 article on vitamin D, the publication of this study shows we are gradually entering the era when open acknowledgement of the health benefits of vitamins will become routine. To read about Dr. Rath’s groundbreaking scientific discovery showing how a nutrient combination - including vitamin C, the amino acids L-lysine and L-proline and the green tea extract EGCG - works synergistically to stop the spread of cancer cells through connective tissue, click here.

July 13, 2010

Higher vitamin E intake tied to lower dementia risk
Older adults who get plenty of vitamin E in their diets may have a somewhat lower risk of developing dementia than those who consume less of the nutrient, a study published Monday suggests. Researchers found that among 5,400 Dutch adults age 55 and older, the one-third who reported the highest vitamin E intake from food were 25 percent less likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, over the next decade than the third with the lowest intakes.
Read Reuters news report at msnbc.com

July 13, 2010

Vitamin B6 may reduce rheumatoid arthritis inflammation
A daily dose of vitamin B6 may help to reduce inflammation associated with the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests.
Read article on the Arthritis Research UK website

July 13, 2010

Vitamin D may slash Parkinson’s risk: Study
High blood levels of vitamin D may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson's disease by 67 per cent, compared with low levels of the sunshine vitamin, says a new study from Finland.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 12, 2010

Osteoporosis Canada issues updated vitamin D guidelines for bone health
TORONTO - Osteoporosis Canada has released updated recommendations on how much vitamin D adults should be taking to keep their bones strong. The new guidelines, published in this week's edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, better reflect research findings about the so-called sunshine vitamin and what should be considered "adequate intake" and the "tolerable upper level."
Read article in the Winnipeg Free Press (Canada)
Comment: The new guidelines recommend daily vitamin D supplements of 400 to 1,000 international units (IUs) for adults under the age of 50 who do not have osteoporosis or conditions affecting the vitamin’s absorption. For adults over 50, with or without the bone-thinning disease, Dr. Bill Leslie, chair of Osteoporosis Canada’s scientific advisory council, says they should take between 800 and 2,000 IUs a day.

July 9, 2010

Fish oil may cut breast cancer risk
Postmenopausal women who take fish oil supplements for at least 10 years may be at less risk of developing breast cancer, according to the results of a recent report in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Regular consumption of fish oil supplements, which contain high levels of the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, was linked with a 32 percent reduced risk of breast cancer concluded the observational study conducted at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 6, 2010

Creatine at low doses promotes resistance to fatigue, study
Low dose supplementation of creatine could help combat fatigue, according to the results of a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 5, 2010

Antioxidants do help arteries stay healthy: study
Long-term supplementation with dietary antioxidants has beneficial effects on sugar and fat metabolism, blood pressure and arterial flexibility in patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Nutrition and Metabolism report these positive results in a randomized controlled trial of combined vitamin C, vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 and selenium capsules.
Read article at physorg.com

July 5, 2010

High blood levels of vitamin E reduces risk of Alzheimer's
High levels of several vitamin E components in the blood are associated with a decreased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in advanced age, suggesting that vitamin E may help prevent cognitive deterioration in elderly people. This is the conclusion reached in a Swedish study published in the July 2010 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.
Read article at physorg.com

July 3, 2010

Pregnant women 'must take vitamin D supplements'
Pregnant women in the UK should be told to routinely take vitamin D supplements, researchers say. The team at University College London Institute of Child Health says official bodies currently offer conflicting advice. Writing in the British Journal of Nutrition, they say there is a "strong case" for a daily dose of vitamin D in pregnancy.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)
Comment: Dr Elina Hypponen, co-author of the paper, says that the routine provision of a daily supplement throughout pregnancy would significantly decrease the number of mothers who are vitamin D deficient, thus reducing related serious health risks to their babies.

July 1, 2010

Resveratrol Linked to Positive Impact on Pre-diabetes
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have linked resveratrol, a chemical compound found in red wine, to improved health of patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), also known as “pre-diabetes.” The results of the small pilot study presented at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) earlier this month showed promise. Among 10 patients with IGT given resveratrol supplements at concentrations higher than those normally found in wine, grapes or peanuts, all demonstrated lower post-meal glucose levels and improved insulin sensitivity - an encouraging outcome with potential implications for those with type 2 diabetes or at high risk for the condition.
Read article at physorg.com

June 28, 2010

Sea buckthorn oil may ease dry eye symptoms
An oil rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids from sea buckthorn may reduce symptoms of dry eye syndrome, says a new study from the University of Turku. Daily supplements of the oil for three months also produced improvements in symptoms for contact lens wearers, according to findings published in the Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 24, 2010

Researcher Confirms Blueberries Can Improve Cardiovascular Health
Nutritionists have long known that one of Maine’s most prized and prolific natural resources, the wild blueberry, provides health benefits that we’re still just learning about. The Wild Blueberry Association of North America calls the Maine blueberry “nature’s antioxidant superfruit,” and cites its ability to reduce the risks for some of the nation’s leading killers and cripplers — heart disease, hypertension, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. Ongoing research by University of Maine professor of clinical nutrition Dorothy Klimis-Zacas and colleagues focuses on the potential of blueberries to protect our blood vessels from degenerative conditions. A leading authority on the health benefits of wild blueberries, Klimis-Zacas has broken new ground in documenting that a wild blueberry-enriched diet can protect the integrity of a thin but vital layer of cells lining the interior of blood vessels that controls constriction or dilation of arteries in the circulatory system.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Additional research suggests that blueberries can counteract intestinal diseases; boost memory in older adults; increase attention span and reverse memory loss.

June 24, 2010

Pine bark extract reduces hay fever symptoms
Pycnogenol, an antioxidant plant extract derived from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, substantially reduces the symptoms of hay fever, a new study has shown.
Read article in the Times of India

June 23, 2010

Omega-3 shows benefits against ‘oxidative stress’: Study
The heart health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA may be related to their ability to reduce oxidative stress, suggests new research. Oxygen-breathing organisms naturally produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play an important role in a range of functions, including cell signalling. However, over production of these ROS from smoking, pollution, sunlight, high intensity exercise, or simply ageing, may overwhelm the body’s antioxidant defences and lead to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress has been linked to an increased risk of various diseases including cancer, Alzheimer's, and cardiovascular disease.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 22, 2010

How vitamin pills could save you from a heart attack
Cholesterol famously comes in two versions - the good and the bad. Heart health, we're told, depends on lowering the bad (LDL) cholesterol, and pushing up the good (HDI). But it's no longer that simple. Bad cholesterol turns out to be part of a double act. What's more, this discovery suggests that a new treatment for heart disease could be a simple vitamin tablet. Researchers recently found that bad cholesterol has a twin called lipoprotein(a), which can also raise your risk of heart disease.
Read article in the Daily Mail (UK)
Comment: Cholesterol-lowering drugs are the single largest business segment of the global pharmaceutical drug business. The fact is, however, that the entire cholesterol business is built on fear – the fear that cholesterol actually causes heart attacks. In this respect, whilst we obviously welcome the publication of research confirming that vitamins can prevent heart attacks, not only can this latest example hardly be described as a “discovery”, it omits to mention crucial scientific facts about lipoprotein(a) that have been known for almost twenty years. As long ago as 1991, a scientific paper published by Dr. Rath and two-time Nobel laureate Linus Pauling described how the primary cause of cardiovascular disease is a deficiency in vitamin C, which leads to the deposition of lipoprotein(a) in the vascular wall. Since then, the pharmaceutical industry’s efforts to cover-up this information have cost literally millions of lives. To read further early scientific papers by Dr. Rath – published between 1989 and 1993 and describing the relationship between vitamin C deficiency, lipoprotein(a) and cardiovascular disease – click here.

June 21, 2010

New evidence: vitamin D prevents flu
A new study published in the peer-reviewed open access journal PloS ONE has confirmed that maintaining high levels of serum vitamin D prevents flu and other respiratory tract infections. The study showed that men and women who had high levels of vitamin D in their blood were much less likely to acquire respiratory tract infections.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

June 21, 2010

Encouraging results from the largest clinical study ever conducted on treating depression with Omega-3
The use of Omega-3 supplements is effective among patients with major depression who do not have anxiety disorders, according to a study directed by Dr. François Lespérance of the Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier at the University of Montreal (CRCHUM). The study was published June 15 in the online Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. This was the largest study ever conducted assessing Omega-3's efficacy in treating major depression.
Read article at physorg.com

June 18, 2010

Supplements beat sun for vitamin D boost: Study
Adequate vitamin D levels are best achieved by supplements because of the side-effects of UV exposure, says the results of a new computer simulation model from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 18, 2010

Science builds for calcium’s bone and heart benefits
Low calcium intakes may increase the risk of osteoporosis and high blood pressure (hypertension), says a new study with Italian postmenopausal women. According to research presented today at EULAR 2010, the Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism in Rome, low calcium intakes (300 milligrams per day or lower) were associated with a 43 per cent increased risk of developing hypertension or osteoporosis, compared with controls.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 15, 2010

Higher levels of vitamin B6, common amino acid associated with lower risk of lung cancer
An analysis that included nearly 400,000 participants finds that those with higher blood levels of vitamin B6 and the essential amino acid methionine (found in most protein) had an associated lower risk of lung cancer, including participants who were current or former smokers, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA.
Read article at physorg.com

June 15, 2010

Breast cancer survivors should take vitamin D – report
Researchers state in an article published in the March 2010 issue of the journal Nutrition that vitamin d should be recommended for breast cancer survivors because evidence is evident that this vitamin can provide a myriad health benefits. For one thing, Hines S. L. and colleagues from the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida say there is evidence suggesting that vitamin D plays a role in breast cancer prevention and survival. Previous studies have already reported that vitamin D intake is inversely associated with the risk of breast cancer, high levels of the vitamin improve survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer and vitamin D insufficiency is found in up to 75 percent of breast cancer patients.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

June 15, 2010

Vitamin D: Not just for bones, says San Francisco VA physician
It is well-known that vitamin D is essential for strong and healthy bones. However, in an article in the online "In Press" section of "Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism," a San Francisco VA Medical Center physician reviews recent scientific literature suggesting that the vitamin may also play a role in preventing cancer, fighting infection, and controlling or preventing auto-immune disease. The researcher, Daniel Bikle, MD, PhD, who also is a professor of medicine and dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco, points to a number of recent epidemiologic studies in which higher blood levels of vitamin D were associated with lower levels of cancer.
Read article at physorg.com

June 9, 2010

Green tea extract may boost heart health for obese
Daily supplements of an extract of green tea may reduce levels of a protein linked to heart disease, says a new study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 9, 2010

B-vitamins may lead to happier seniors: Study
Increased intakes of vitamins B6 and B12 may reduce the risk of seniors developing depressive symptoms, says a new study with 3,500 Chicagoans. For every 10 milligram increase in the intake of vitamin B6 and for every 10 microgram increase in vitamin B12 the risk of developing symptoms of depression were decreased by 2 per cent per year, according to findings published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 5, 2010

Green tea extract may slow leukaemia, researchers have suggested
An extract taken from green tea reduces cancer cells in the blood of patients with a form of leukaemia and may slow progression of the disease, a conference will hear. Researchers at the prestigious Mayo Clinic in America have found that patients in the early stages of the most common form of leukaemia may respond well to taken supplements of a green tea extract.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: The results from this latest trial build upon previous research in leukaemia using the green tea extract epigallocatechin galeate (EGCG) and show that 31 percent of patients given the supplement had a 20 percent or greater sustained reduction in blood leukemia count, whilst 69 percent of patients with enlarged lymph nodes saw a reduction of node size of 50 percent or greater. Just as with the finding that green tea extracts can inhibit the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), however, this latest report that EGCG is effective in treating leukaemia patients is no surprise to us. To read about Dr. Rath’s scientific discovery showing how a nutrient combination - including vitamin C, the amino acids L-lysine and L-proline and EGCG - works synergistically to stop the spread of cancer cells through connective tissue, click here.

June 1, 2010

Study supports cranberry dose levels for urinary health
The ability of cranberry proanthocyanidins (PACs) is dependent on the dose, with higher doses significantly more effective at maintaining urinary health, says a new study. The study supports levels outlined by a French health claim, issued in 2004, for the North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) with at least 36 milligrams of proanthocyanidins (PAC) to “help reduce the adhesion of certain E. coli bacteria to the urinary tract walls”, and subsequently fight urinary tract infections (UTIs). Indeed, a lower dose of 18 mg of cranberry PACs was less effective, according to the results of a randomized, double-blind versus placebo study based in Japan, Hungary, Spain and France. On the other hand, a higher dose of 72 mg was even more efficient at protecting against bacterial adhesion in the urinary tract, according to findings published in the open-access journal BMC Infectious Diseases.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 28, 2010

Studies Find Increasing Health Benefits From Vitamin D
The U.S. Institute of Medicine is involved in a study that will likely result in an increase in the recommended daily intake of vitamin D. Research shows vitamin D affects nearly every area of the body and low levels of vitamin D can have serious consequences.
Read article on the Voice of America news website (USA)

May 27, 2010

Vitamin K linked to lower diabetes risk
People who get plenty of vitamin K from food may have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who get less of the vitamin, a new study suggests.
Researchers found that among more than 38,000 Dutch adults they followed for a decade, those who got the most vitamin K in their diets were about 20 percent less likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during the study period.
Read article at reuters.com
Comment: To read the abstract for this study, click here.

May 26, 2010

Brief exercise reduces impact of stress on cell aging, study shows
Exercise can buffer the effects of stress-induced cell aging, according to new research from UCSF that revealed actual benefits of physical activity at the cellular level. The scientists learned that vigorous physical activity as brief as 42 minutes over a 3-day period, similar to federally recommended levels, can protect individuals from the effects of stress by reducing its impact on telomere length. Telomeres (pronounced TEEL-oh-meres) are tiny pieces of DNA that promote genetic stability and act as protective sheaths by keeping chromosomes from unraveling, much like plastic tips at the ends of shoelaces. A growing body of research suggests that short telomeres are linked to a range of health problems, including coronary heart disease and diabetes, as well as early death.
Read article at physorg.com

May 20, 2010

Organic beetroot boosts stamina: Study
Drinking organic beetroot juice boosts stamina and could help you exercise for up to 15 per cent longer, according to a study published by the UK University of Exeter's School of Sport and Health Sciences. Study leader Professor Andy Jones said: “Our study is the first to show that nitrate-rich food can increase exercise endurance. We were amazed by the effects of beetroot juice on oxygen uptake because these effects cannot be achieved by any other known means, including training.” In addition to endurance athletes, the research team believes drinking beetroot juice could also benefit elderly people or those with cardiovascular, respiratory or metabolic diseases. “I am also keen to explore the relevance of the findings to those people who suffer from poor fitness and may be able to use dietary supplements to help them go about their daily lives,” said Jones.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: Additional research from the UK suggests that drinking 500ml of beetroot juice a day can significantly reduce blood pressure.

May 19, 2010

Researchers find daily ginger consumption eases muscle pain by 25 percent
For centuries, ginger root has been used as a folk remedy for a variety of ailments such as colds and upset stomachs. But now, researchers at the University of Georgia have found that daily ginger consumption also reduces muscle pain caused by exercise.
Read article at physorg.com

May 16, 2010

Vitamin E may protect lungs
People who take vitamin E supplements regularly for years -- whether they are smokers or nonsmokers -- may lower their risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the lung condition that is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States.
Read article at cnn.com

May 14, 2010

Iron Supplements Effectively Treat Kids' Breath-Holding Spells
For many children, “I'm going to hold my breath until I pass out” is not an idle threat. An estimated one in 20 kids suffer from breath-holding spells, which come when they are upset, in pain or surprised. In some cases, the children twitch and jerk around involuntarily, as if they are having a seizure. Their faces sometimes turn blue or pale and they often faint. It can be scary for parents and often frightening for kids too, who aren’t thought to be able to make the spells come on voluntarily. Some kids might faint several times a day, distracting everyone around them. Now, a new review of existing research - two studies - finds that a small daily dose of iron reduced or eliminated incidents of breath-holding spells more than 90 percent of the time.
Read article at physorg.com

May 11, 2010

Study: Folate helps repair damage linked to aging and disease
For more than half a century, scientists have known the importance of folate for good health, especially for expectant mothers. But now, researchers at the University of Florida have discovered an entirely new role the vitamin plays in maintaining health: it helps moderate oxidative stress, which is linked to aging and disease
Read article at physorg.com

May 11, 2010

Chromium picolinate may boost elderly memory
Supplements of chromium picolinate may boost memory function in the elderly, says a new placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Writing in the findings published in Nutritional Neuroscience, scientists by University of Cincinnati College of Medicine report that daily supplements of the compound improved learning, recall, and recognition memory tasks.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

May 10, 2010

Folic acid found to improve vascular function in amenorrheic runners
A study led by sports medicine researcher Anne Hoch, D.O. at The Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee has found that oral folic acid may provide a safe and inexpensive treatment to improve vascular function in young female runners who are amenorrheic (not menstruating). The study is published in the May 2010 issue of Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.
Read article at physorg.com

May 10, 2010

NASA Studies Find Omega-3 May Help Reduce Bone Loss
NASA-sponsored studies have found that omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil may play a role in mitigating bone breakdown that occurs during spaceflight and in osteoporosis. Ongoing research for decades has looked for ways to stop bone density loss in astronauts. The solution could have significant implications for space travelers and those susceptible to bone loss on Earth.
Read article at physorg.com

May 10, 2010

Eating nuts can lower cholesterol, say experts
Eating nuts may help lower cholesterol levels, US research suggests. The review of 25 studies, involving nearly 600 people, showed eating on average 67g of nuts - a small bag - a day reduced cholesterol levels by 7.4%.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

May 5, 2010

Mega-Dose Vitamin Therapy in the ICU
Decades ago, when Linus Pauling and Abram Hoffer first proposed mega-dose vitamin therapy as a serious treatment, mainstream medicine, aided by the press, promptly discredited this as quackery. To this day, the media faithfully bombards us with the message that vitamins and minerals are useless, harmful or even killing us. When one considers the lowly vitamin pill as an economic rival to drugs, and the dependence of the media on drug company advertising, the motivation to discredit mega-dose vitamins becomes all too obvious. Seemingly oblivious to this negative message, physicians quietly go about their business using megadose vitamin therapy in the intensive care unit with considerable success. Recent reports of this have been appearing in medical journals, finally vindicating Linus Pauling and Abram Hoffer as yes, of course, they were right all along.
Read article by Jeffrey Dach MD

May 5, 2010

Resveratrol may boost blood flow in the brain: Study
High doses of resveratrol may improve blood flow in the brain and potentially boost brain health, say results of a new human study from the UK.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 3, 2010

Higher daily doses of vitamin D lower risk of preterm births: Study
All pregnant women should take 4,000 international units of vitamin D daily — 10 to 20 times the dose the leaders of Canada's pregnancy specialists currently recommend — to lower their risk of preterm labour, preterm birth and infections concludes the first study to investigate the safety of high doses of vitamin D during pregnancy. The study found that women in its 4,000-IU-a-day group had half the risk of premature delivery than women who took just 400 IU of vitamin D daily. Premature birth is the leading cause of newborn deaths in Canada. And "not a single adverse event" related to vitamin D dosing was found during the study — as U.S. researchers will report Saturday at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in Vancouver.
Read article in the Vancouver Sun (Canada)

May 3, 2010

DHA Supplements for Mom Good for Preemies
Leads to higher levels in breast milk of fatty acid that promotes brain development, researchers find
Very premature infants have higher levels of DHA -- an omega-3 fatty acid that's essential to the growth and development of the brain -- when their breast-feeding mothers take DHA supplements, Canadian researchers have found. Researchers say a deficiency in DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) is common in very preterm infants, possibly because the ordinary diets of many pregnant or breast-feeding women lack the essential fatty acid, which is found in cold water fatty fish and fish oil supplements.
Read article at businessweek.com

May 2, 2010

Olive oil could guard against developing ulcerative colitis
Eating more olive oil could help prevent ulcerative colitis, according to a new study co-ordinated by medical researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA).
Read article at physorg.com

April 28, 2010

Vitamin E helps nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Vitamin E pills can help people with a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease called steatohepatitis, researchers reported Wednesday.
Read article in the Los Angeles Times (USA)

April 27, 2010

Study supports astaxanthin’s immune boosting power
Daily supplements of astaxanthin – the pigment that gives salmon its pink colour – may protect DNA from damage and boost the immune response in healthy young women, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

April 26, 2010

Proper intake of vitamin D improves quality of life for seniors
A new study suggests that proper intake of vitamin D (the 'sunshine' vitamin) is related to better physical function in seniors.
Read article at dnaindia.com (India)

April 23, 2010

Multi-vitamin during pregnancy 'cuts chances of having an underweight baby'
Taking a multivitamin during pregnancy can dramatically cut the chances of having an underweight baby, according to a new study.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

April 19, 2010

Vitamin K may protect against developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, say researchers
In the first study of vitamin K and Non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk, researchers at the Mayo Clinic campus in Minnesota have found that people who have higher intakes of vitamin K from their diet have a lower risk of developing Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma is a cancer of the immune system and is the most common hematologic malignancy in the United States.
Read article at physorg.com

April 18, 2010

Daily Calcium and Vitamins Linked to Lower Breast Cancer Risk
Calcium doesn’t just build strong bones, it may fight cancer too, a study said. Researchers at the Ponce School of Medicine in Puerto Rico reported that women who took calcium had a 40 percent lower risk of getting breast cancer, while those getting multivitamins showed a 30 percent reduction in risk. The new findings, from a study of 744 women, were presented today at the meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Washington.
Read article at businessweek.com

April 17, 2010

New evidence: Vitamin D supplements reduce breast cancer risk
A new study led by Canadian researchers and published in the April 14, 2010 issue of American Journal of Clicnical Nutrition suggests that taking vitamin D supplements may help reduce breast cancer risk drastically. Anderson L.N. and colleagues from Population Studies Surveillance Cancer Care Ontario in Toronto Canada conducted the case-control study and found women taking 400 IU/day of vitamin D were at 24 percent lower risk of breast cancer compared to those who did not take supplements.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

April 15, 2010

Lutein plus vitamin A may slow vision loss: Study
A daily supplement of lutein in combination with vitamin A may slow vision loss associated with retinitis pigmentosa, according to the results of a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial. Writing in the Archives of Ophthalmology, American scientists report that a daily supplement containing 12 milligrams of lutein in combination with 15,000 International Units of vitamin A (retinyl palmitate) was associated with a preservation of mid-peripheral vision.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

April 15, 2010

Diet high in B vitamins lowers heart risks in Japanese study
Eating more foods containing the B-vitamins folate and B-6 lowers the risk of death from stroke and heart disease for women and may reduce the risk of heart failure in men, according to Japanese research reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.
Read article at physorg.com

April 12, 2010

Omega-3 intakes may improve diabetic kidney health
Increased intakes of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce kidney damage in type-1 diabetics, without impacting the incidence of the condition, says a new study. Kidney function was improved in type-1 diabetics with the highest average intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), compared with people with the lower intakes of the fatty acids, according to findings published in Diabetes Care. The results are based on data from 1,436 participants in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial – a trial including people aged between 13 and 39 and funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 12, 2010

Less than half an hour of exercise a day helps treat depression
Just 25 minutes of vigorous daily exercise can help beat depression, claim doctors. Researchers found that a workout reduces stress and anger and boosts the sense of physical wellbeing. They claim physical exercise should be more widely prescribed as a treatment to tackle depressive or anxiety disorders.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

April 9, 2010

Green tea extract effective for weight loss at low doses
Daily supplements of a purified extract of green tea may increase energy expenditure and help men beat the bulge, say results from a new human study. A low dose of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) from green tea was found to increase fat oxidation by 33 per cent, according to findings published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 8, 2010

Zinc may ease female anger and depression: Study
Daily supplements of zinc may reduce measures of anger and depression in young women, according to a new study from Japan. A daily supplement of 7 milligrams of zinc as zinc gluconate was associated with significant decreases in measures of anger-hostility and depression-dejection, report scientists from Daigaku Junior College and Seitoku University in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 8, 2010

The Mediterranean Diet—Can It Help You Live Longer?
People who adhere to the principles of the traditional Mediterranean Diet tend to live longer. This is the conclusion of a recent peer-reviewed study by Dr Perez-Lopez and his team from the University of Zaragoza, Spain. The scientists examined all the existing scientific literature on the health benefits of the Mediterranean Diet.
Read article on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH)

April 7, 2010

Cuba Touts New Medicine as Treatment for Cancer, AIDS
HAVANA – State-run Cuban media outlets announced Tuesday the distribution on the island of a “natural” medicine that can serve to fight AIDS, cancer, malaria, diabetes, arthritis, rheumatism and even memory loss. “A batch of 160,000 tablets of ‘anamu,’ a new immunostimulatory herbal medicine produced by the Oriente pharmaceutical laboratory, will help patients with cancer and AIDS,” the official AIN news agency said. It added that anamu – Petiveria alliacea, also commonly known as “garlic weed” due to its strong garlic-like odor – in the form of tea, is also efficacious as an “anti-spasmotic, diuretic, stimulant and sudorific, local analgesic and anti-inflamatory in different skin complaints, and it is used against arthritis, malaria, rheumatism and memory problems.”
Read article in the Latin American Herald Tribune (Venezuela)

April 6, 2010

Omega-3 may slash risk of heart failure: Study
Increased intakes of fatty fish, and the omega-3s they contain, may reduce a woman’s risk of heart failure by about 25 per cent, according to new findings from the US and Sweden.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 2, 2010

Vitamin D could save Germany €40 billion in health costs
Ensuring the German population gets adequate intakes of vitamin D could save the country about €37.5 billion in health care costs, according to a new review. Writing in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, Professor Armin Zittermann from Ruhr University Bochum states that up to 45 per cent of the German population could be vitamin D insufficient, with an additional 15 to 30 per cent deficient, thereby putting them at risk at a variety of health problems. In addition, current recommendations are not enough and need to be doubled at least, wrote Prof Zittermann, with daily intakes of 25 micrograms required. This would represent a significant increase from current recommendations, which range from 5 to 10 micrograms per day.
Read news release at nutraingredients.com

April 2, 2010

Vitamin D may save 40,000 Canadian lives per year
Inadequate levels of vitamin D may be causing about 37,000 premature deaths in Canada and costing the country billions of dollars, according to a new review. Writing in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, researchers led by William Grant from the Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center (SUNARC) in San Francisco report that the economic burden was also decrease if vitamin D levels were improved, and would save about $14.4 billion. “The results of this study strongly suggest that the personal and economic burden of disease in Canada could be significantly reduced if the mean serum 25(OH)D level was increased from its current level of 67 nmol/L to the optimal level of 105nmol/L,” wrote the researchers.
Read news release at nutraingredients-usa.com

April 1, 2010

Study backs vitamin D and calcium supplements
New research suggests that Vitamin D and calcium supplements may be helping Americans approach adequate intake levels.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

March 30, 2010

Vitamin K may reduce cancer risk: EPIC study
Consuming foods rich in vitamin K2 may reduce the risk of cancer, says a new study supporting the potential anti-cancer benefits of this emerging nutrient.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 30, 2010

1,200 IU of vitamin D daily may prevent flu
The reason why flu season breaks out every winter and then vanishes every summer has been a mystery long puzzling medical researchers. Now, Japanese doctors may have found an answer to the enigma – low levels of vitamin D during the dark winter months. In the first drug-style clinical trial giving relatively large doses of the vitamin to children, researchers found it was a potent flu-fighter. Those receiving the sunshine vitamin had a 42-per-cent reduction in the most severe type of flu, known as influenza A, compared to those not receiving the nutrient. The group not getting the vitamin also had six times more asthma attacks. The experiment was conducted on about 350 otherwise healthy school-aged children, using doses of 1,200 International Units a day, six times the amount currently recommended by Health Canada.
Read article in The Globe and Mail (Canada)

March 29, 2010

Multivitamins during pregnancy may boost infant health
Daily supplements of multivitamins during pregnancy may improve the growth of the baby in the womb, says a study with African American women. Women who were taking daily multivitamins in and around the time of conception gave birth to babies who weighed on average half a kilo more than babies from women not taking the supplements, report Heather Burris from Harvard University and Allen Mitchell and Martha Werler from Boston University in the Annals of Epidemiology.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

March 24, 2010

Antioxidants show benefits for over-50 sporty-types
Supplements containing antioxidants and arginine may boost athletic performance for the over-50s, says a new study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

March 21, 2010

Study urges vitamin D supplement for infants
Most babies should take a daily vitamin D supplement, a new study shows. That will be a big change for most parents — and even many pediatricians. Only 1% to 13% of infants under 1 year now get a vitamin D supplement, available in inexpensive drops, according to a study published online today in Pediatrics. Those drops are needed, the study says, because only 5% to 37% of American infants met the standard for vitamin D set by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2008: 400 international units a day. Vitamin D strengthens bone and the immune system and also appears to prevent type 1 diabetes, heart disease and cancer, the paper says.
Read article in USA Today

March 18, 2010

NASA examines omega-3 for bone health during space flight
Supplements of omega-3 EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) may protect against bone loss during weightlessness, according to a new study from NASA.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: The researchers say that similar results were observed for people with extended periods of bed-rest and that their data could benefit the general population.

March 18, 2010

Selenium Could Shield Against Diabetes
High levels in men appear to be beneficial, study finds
Scientists have found evidence that older men with higher levels of selenium are less likely to suffer from dysglycemia, or improper blood-sugar metabolism.
Read article at businessweek.com
Comment: To read the abstract for this study, click here.

March 16, 2010

Green tea may boost oral health, reduce tooth loss
Drinking one cup of green tea may improve dental health and reduce the risk of loosing teeth by about 20 per cent, according to a new study from Japan. And drinking more cups appears to confer additional risk reductions, with five or more cups a day associated with a 23 per cent reduction in risk, according to findings from the Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study published in Preventive Medicine.
Read article at foodnavigator.com
Comment: Additional research suggests that Green tea may block lung cancer; reduce the risk of death from colorectal cancer and heart disease; protect against blood cell cancer; protect against breast cancer; halve the risks of developing advanced prostate cancer and combat depression. Similarly, research has also shown that supplements containing extracts of green tea can inhibit the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); treat leukaemia; prevent oral cancer; reduce levels of compounds linked to prostate cancer progression; lower blood pressure and boost blood vessel health. To read about Dr. Rath’s research showing how a nutrient combination - including the green tea extract Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG), vitamin C, L-lysine and L-proline - works synergistically to stop the spread of cancer cells through connective tissue, click here.

March 16, 2010

Omega-3-rich meals have blood vessel benefits: Study
Increased intakes of omega-3 fatty acids may improve blood vessel health following a meal, says a new study from the UK. Arteries were found to be less stiff following consumption of a medium fat meal supplemented with 4.7 grams of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), according to findings published in Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

March 16, 2010

Vitamin B6 ingredient linked to lower colorectal cancer risk: study
Vitamin B6 appears to play a beneficial role in preventing colon cancer, a study published Tuesday concluded. Researchers led by Susanna Larsson of Sweden's National Institute of Environmental medicine traced the beneficial effects to pyridoxal-phosphate (PLP), the main active coenzyme form of vitamin B6. "Vitamin B6 intake and blood PLP levels were inversely related with the risk of colorectal cancer," the study said.
Read article at physorg.com

March 15, 2010

Magnesium may decrease colon cancer risk: Study
Increased intakes of magnesium may reduce a man’s risk of colon cancer by over 50 per cent, says a new observational study from Japan.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 15, 2010

Studies find treating vitamin D deficiency significantly reduces heart disease risk
Preventing and treating heart disease in some patients could be as simple as supplementing their diet with extra vitamin D, according to two new studies at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah. Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute last fall demonstrated the link between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk for coronary artery disease. These new studies show that treating vitamin D deficiency with supplements may help to prevent or reduce a person's risk for cardiovascular disease and a host of other chronic conditions.
Read article at physorg.com

March 12, 2010

Short blasts of exercise as good as hours of training, scientists find
Less really can be more when it comes to exercise, scientists have discovered.
The body can get as much benefit from a short but intensive bursts of exercise lasting ten minutes than it can from ten hours of moderate training. The technique not only takes less time but also involves much less physical effort. Researchers believe their findings "blow away" the belief that staying in shape is a time-consuming affair. The claim was made after a study into the benefits of "high intensity interval training", known as HIT, by McMaster University, Ontario, Canada. The technique involves running or cycling at almost maximum effort for a minute and then resting for a minute before repeating the process around 10 times.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

March 12, 2010

Berries may reduce risk factors for metabolic disorders
A diet rich in berries may reduce levels of inflammatory markers associated with liver health and metabolic syndrome, says a new study from Finland. Daily consumption of a range of berries, including lingonberry, sea buckthorn, bilberry, and black currant produced a 23 per cent reduction in levels of an enzyme called alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), a well-established marker of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to findings published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 7, 2010

Vitamin D crucial to activating immune defenses
Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have discovered that Vitamin D is crucial to activating our immune defenses and that without sufficient intake of the vitamin, the killer cells of the immune system - T cells - will not be able to react to and fight off serious infections in the body.
Read article at physorg.com

March 4, 2010

Red clover may counter depressive symptoms in older women
Post-menopausal women taking supplements of a red clover extract may experience fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety, says a new randomised trial from Austria. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were reduced by about 80 per cent following 90 days of supplements containing 80 milligrams of red clover isoflavones, according to findings of a prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial published in Maturitas.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 3, 2010

Omega-3 may boost lung function during sport
Supplements of omega-3 fatty acids may improve lung function of athletes during and after exercise, suggests a new study from Germany and Iran with wrestlers.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 3, 2010

Vitamin D lifts mood during cold weather months
A daily dose of vitamin D may just be what Chicagoans need to get through the long winter, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing (MNSON). This nutrient lifts mood during cold weather months when days are short and more time is spent indoors.
Read article at physorg.com

March 1, 2010

DHA brain benefits may extend to middle age
Increased intakes of the omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenonic acid) may improve mental function in middle age people, suggests a new study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 25, 2010

High calcium intakes may improve male survival: Study
Intakes of calcium above the recommended daily levels may reduce the risk of dying from heart disease and cancer by 25 per cent, says a new study from Sweden. Average daily intakes of 1,953 m of the mineral were also associated with a non-significant lower risk of mortality from only heart disease, compared to average daily intakes of 990 mg per day, according to findings published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 25, 2010

Multivitamins may help weight loss in obese women
Supplements of multivitamins and minerals may help reduce body weight and improve blood fat levels, according to results of a clinical trial in obese Chinese women. Results of a 26-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention study with 87 women found that multivitamins and minerals were associated with significantly lower body weight, body mass index, and fat mass. Levels of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were also significantly reduced, while HDL-cholesterol were increased, according to findings published in the International Journal of Obesity.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 23, 2010

Omega-3, vitamins, minerals may reduce aggressive behaviour
Supplements of omega-3s, vitamins and minerals for prisoners may reduce the number of violent and aggressive episodes in prisoners, according to a new study from The Netherlands. Nutritional supplements containing vitamins, minerals, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were associated with a 34 per cent reduction in violent incidents, according to findings of a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial with over 200 young adult offenders published in Aggressive Behavior.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: Extensive research conducted in the UK in the past twenty years has resulted in similar conclusions to those reported in this study. As a result, the role nutrition may play in shaping social behavior both in the community and in closed conditions is becoming increasingly clear. According to Natural Justice, a UK charity based in Oxford that is working to develop a fundamentally new approach to violent and anti-social behavior, the underlying thesis is simple: the brain needs to be nourished like all other parts of the body, and it is vital to consider the nutritional needs of the brain as a key factor in governing behavior. For more information on the research conducted in the UK on the relationship between social behavior and nutrition, click here.

February 23, 2010

Antioxidants may help lower diabetes rates, study
Higher consumption of antioxidants in the diet in order to lower the rate of diabetes should be made a public health priority, according to a new study. The findings of the study, published in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases supports the view that dietary antioxidants are associated with improved glycemic biomarkers in healthy adults, as well as in diabetic patients.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 22, 2010

Folic acid supplements may reduce pre-term births
Maintaining supplementation with folic acid through to the third trimester of pregnancy may reduce the risk of preterm births, says a new study from Hungary.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 18, 2010

Very high omega-3 intakes linked to big health benefits
Intakes of omega-3 exceeding levels consumed by the general US population may significantly reduce the risk of chronic disease, suggests a new study with Yup'ik Eskimos. High levels of the omega-3 fatty acids EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) were associated with lower levels of triglycerides, as well as higher levels of HDL cholesterol, according to data from 357 Yup'ik Eskimos published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Raised levels of the fatty acids were also associated with decreased levels of markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), which is produced in the liver and is a known marker for inflammation. Increased levels of CRP are a good predictor for the onset of both type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. CVD causes almost 50 per cent of deaths in Europe, and is reported to cost the EU economy an estimated €169 billion ($202 billion) per year.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 16, 2010

Cocktail of five vitamins may give cancer patients an extra two years
Cancer patients with terminal disease who take a daily cocktail of vitamins could extend their lives by two years or even longer, claim researchers. Three out of four in a pilot study survived an average of five months longer than the expected one year, and some were still alive three years after treatment started.
Read article in the Daily Mail (UK)
Comment: As with the ‘Dietary Formula That Maintains Youthful Function Into Old Age’ story, dated February 12, below, this study provides still further confirmation of the effectiveness of the nutrient synergy approach pioneered by Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki. Rather than using single nutrients, the approach taken at the Dr. Rath Research Institute utilises carefully chosen multiple ingredients as a means of affecting defined biological targets. To learn about Dr. Rath’s scientific discovery in the control of cancer, click here.

February 15, 2010

High levels of vitamin D in older people can reduce heart disease and diabetes
Middle aged and elderly people with high levels of vitamin D could reduce their chances of developing heart disease or diabetes by 43%, according to researchers at the University of Warwick.
Read article at physorg.com

February 15, 2010

Magnesium supplements may boost lung health for asthmatics
Daily supplements of magnesium may improve lung function in asthmatics, and improve their quality of life, says a new study from America. Measures of lung capacity increased by about 6 per cent during six months of magnesium supplementation, and improvements were also observed in the bronchial response to methacholine, a chemical that produces constriction of the lungs, according to findings published in the Journal of Asthma.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 13, 2010

Walking regularly and taking supplement 'can significantly ease pain of arthritis'
Walking less than two miles a couple of times a week and taking a natural supplement can significantly ease the crippling pain of arthritis, a new study shows.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: The study found that a supplement of glucosamine sulphate, when combined with walking around a mile and a half in distance, three times a week, resulted in patients feeling better within weeks. After six months, the patients reported that their pain levels had halved.

February 12, 2010

Dietary Formula That Maintains Youthful Function Into Old Age
Researchers at McMaster University have developed a cocktail of ingredients that forestalls major aspects of the aging process. The findings are published in the current issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine. "As we all eventually learn, ageing diminishes our mind, fades our perception of the world and compromises our physical capacity," says David Rollo, associate professor of biology at McMaster. "Declining physical activity -- think of grandparents versus toddlers -- is one of the most reliable expressions of ageing and is also a good indicator of obesity and general mortality risk." The study found that a complex dietary supplement powerfully offsets this key symptom of ageing in old mice by increasing the activity of the cellular furnaces that supply energy -- or mitochondria -- and by reducing emissions from these furnaces -- or free radicals -- that are thought to be the basic cause of ageing itself.
Read article at sciencedaily.com
Comment: As with the ‘Cocktail of five vitamins may give cancer patients an extra two years’ story, dated February 16, above, this study provides still further confirmation of the effectiveness of the nutrient synergy approach pioneered by Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki. Rather than using single nutrients, the approach taken at the Dr. Rath Research Institute utilises carefully chosen multiple ingredients as a means of affecting defined biological targets. Once the science behind this methodology becomes used as the basis for forming national public health policies, problems such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, AIDS and other common diseases will become largely unknown to future generations.

February 9, 2010

Blueberries counteract intestinal diseases
It is already known that blueberries are rich in antioxidants and vitamins. New research from the Lund University Faculty of Engineering in Sweden shows that blueberry fibre are important and can alleviate and protect against intestinal inflammations, such as ulcerative colitis. The protective effect is even better if the blueberries are eaten together with probiotics.
Read article at physorg.com

February 8, 2010

Exercise 'cuts risk of developing painful gallstones'
Doing lots of exercise drastically cuts the risk of developing painful gallstones, UK researchers have found. Gallstones are common but only 30% of cases have symptoms and complications. A University of East Anglia study of 25,000 men and women found those who were the most active had a 70% reduced risk of those complaints.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

February 6, 2010

Saffron, Spice That Saves Your Sight
People could be saved from incurable blindness by the yellow spice saffron, according to a new study. It has been hailed as a weapon in the fight against one of the commonest causes of sight loss, age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Read article in the Daily Express (UK)

February 5, 2010

Omega-3 may combat mouth bacteria, boost oral health
The dental health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids may include anti-bacterial effects, extending the benefits beyond inflammation, says a new study from the University of Kentucky. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine and plant origin were found to have strong anti-bacterial activity against a range of oral pathogens, according to findings published in Molecular Oral Microbiology.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 3, 2010

Hibiscus tea may reduce blood pressure in at-risk people
A few cups of hibiscus tea a day may reduce blood pressure and offer cardiovascular benefits for people at risk of developing hypertension, says a new study from Tufts University. Three 240 mL servings a day of tea made with hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) were associated with a 7.2 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure and a 3.1 mmHg reduction in diastolic blood pressure, compared to 1.3 and 0.5 mmHg in the placebo group, according to findings published in The Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 3, 2010

Omega-3 may boost kidney health in diabetics: Study
Supplements of omega-3 fatty acids may improve the kidney health of diabetics, say results of a double-blind placebo-controlled trial from Hong Kong.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 2, 2010

Fish oil 'reduces youth psychosis'
Fish oil supplements can dramatically reduce the chance of young people developing psychosis or schizophrenia, Australian researchers say.
Read article in the Sydney Morning Herald (Australia)

February 1, 2010

Vitamin, minerals may reduce eczema risk in children
Increased intakes of beta-carotene, vitamin E, folic acid, and iron may reduce the risk of atopic dermatitis, a form of eczema, suggests a new study from Korea. Children with the highest average intakes of the four nutrients were found to have significantly lower risks of atopic dermatitis, than children with the lowest average intakes, according to findings published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 28, 2010

Omega-3 may reduce risk of dental disease: Study
Increased levels of omega-3 fatty acid DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) may decrease the risk of dental diseases, suggests a new study from Japan. The average number of dental disease events was 1.5 times higher in people with low DHA levels, compared to those with the highest average levels of DHA, according to findings published in Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 27, 2010

Vitamin D Supplements Could Fight Crohn's Disease
A new study has found that Vitamin D, readily available in supplements or cod liver oil, can counter the effects of Crohn's disease. John White, an endocrinologist at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, led a team of scientists from McGill University and the Université de Montréal who present their findings about the inflammatory bowel disease in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

January 21, 2010

High Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Risk of Colon Cancer
High blood levels of vitamin D are associated with a lower risk of colon cancer, finds a large European study published online in the British Medical Journal. The risk was cut by as much as 40% in people with the highest levels compared with those in the lowest.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

January 20, 2010

Vitamin D supplementation can reduce falls in nursing care facilities
Giving people living in nursing facilities vitamin D can reduce the rate of falls, according to a new Cochrane Review.
Read article at physorg.com

January 20, 2010

Aerobic exercise grows brain cells
Aerobic exercises such as running or jogging have long been known to be good for the health, but now new research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) has shown that it also stimulates the growth of new brain cells and improves the memory and ability to learn.
Read article at physorg.com

January 20, 2010

Intravenous fish oil in ICU effective
A trial of fish oil given intravenously to patients in intensive care reduces inflammation and results in a shorter hospital stay, British researchers say.
Read news report on the United Press International (UPI) website

January 19, 2010

Omega-3s May Slow Aging in Heart Patients
Heart disease patients with the highest blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids appear to age more slowly than those with the lowest blood levels, according to a new study.
Read article at webmd.com

January 19, 2010

Antioxidant-rich fruit and veg may cut lymph cancer risk
Increased intakes of antioxidant-rich vegetables may reduce the risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma by about 30 per cent, says a new study. Increased dietary intakes of specific antioxidant nutrients, like vitamin C, alpha-carotene, and proanthocyanidins were also individually associated with significant reductions in risks for the cancer, according to results published from the Iowa Women's Health Study in the International Journal of Cancer.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 15, 2010

St. John's wort may cool hot flashes
The popular herbal remedy St. John's wort may help ease menopausal hot flashes, a small study suggests.
Read news report at reuters.com

January 13, 2010

Green tea 'may block lung cancer'
Drinking green tea may offer some protection against lung cancer, say experts who studied the disease at a medical university in Taiwan. The latest work in more than 500 people adds to growing evidence suggesting the beverage has anti-cancer powers.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)
Comment: Just as with the finding that green tea extracts can inhibit the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the news that green tea may block lung cancer is no surprise to us. To read about Dr. Rath’s research showing how a nutrient combination – including vitamin C, the amino acids L-lysine and L-proline and a green tea extract known as Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) – works synergistically to stop the spread of cancer cells through connective tissue, click here.

January 13, 2010

Multivitamins may cut lung cancer risk in smokers
Multivitamins, folate, and green leafy vegetables may reduce the risk of developing lung cancer in current and former smokers, says a new study from the US.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

January 13, 2010

Calcium, vitamin D reduce fracture risk
People who take daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D significantly reduce their risk of suffering a fracture, irrespective of their age, gender or previous fracture history, the results of a new study indicate.
Read article at irishhealth.com
Comment: The researchers found that vitamin D supplements alone were not effective in preventing fractures. However, calcium and vitamin D given together reduced hip fractures and total fractures. As such, this study provides still further support for the research findings of Dr. Rath, Dr. Niedzwiecki and their researchers at the Dr. Rath Research Institute, who, for some years now, have focused their attention on nutrient synergy as the most effective approach to optimizing cellular metabolism and restoring its balance. The concept of nutrient synergy maximizes the health benefits of micronutrients because of the discovery that they work best in "teams". Thus, it is not the intake of any one single nutrient that ensures full health, but the intake of a complete spectrum of various different micronutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids and trace elements. To read about clinical studies conducted by the Dr. Rath Research Institute that utilize nutrient synergy, click here. To read about a study demonstrating reduced fracture-healing time associated with nutrient supplementation, click here.

January 12, 2010

Pine bark extract may ease haemorrhoid problems
Supplements of French maritime pine bark extract may reduce the intensity and duration of haemorrhoidal pain and bleeding, says a new study. A daily supplement of the pine bark extract, Pycnogenol, for seven days reduced pain around the anus from an initial average of 3.2 points on a four-point pain scale to about 0.8 at the end of the study, according to findings published in Phytotherapy Research.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 11, 2010

Blueberries may boost memory in older adults: Study
Supplemental blueberries for only 12 weeks may boost memory in older people with early memory problems, says a new study from the US. A daily drink of about 500 mL of blueberry juice was associated with improved learning and word list recall, as well as a suggestion of reduced depressive symptoms, according to findings published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: The results of this study add to similar findings by other researchers, who have found that blueberries can increase attention span and reverse memory loss.

January 6, 2010

Review supports omega-3 for liver health
Increased intakes of omega-3 fatty acids from marine sources may benefit people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), says a new review of the literature. A review of four human studies found that the fatty acids could improve liver health and function, and increase insulin sensitivity in people suffering from fatty liver, a condition that is usually symptomless but said to increase the risk for liver inflammation, and ultimately results in liver failure.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 6, 2010

Vitamins and minerals may slash bladder cancer risk
Increased intakes of vitamin E may reduce the risk of bladder cancer by about 35 per cent, says a new study from an international team of researchers. Findings published in Cancer Causes and Control also showed that carotenoids, niacin, thiamine, and vitamin D may reduce the risk of bladder cancer in older people.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 5, 2010

Natural compounds in pomegranates may prevent growth of hormone-dependent breast cancer
Eating fruit, such as pomegranates, that contain anti-aromatase phytochemicals reduces the incidence of hormone-dependent breast cancer, according to results of a study published in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Pomegranate is enriched in a series of compounds known as ellagitannins that, as shown in this study, appear to be responsible for the anti-proliferative effect of the pomegranate.
Read article at physorg.com

January 4, 2010

Survival of the fittest: exercise 'can fight ageing'
Long-term physical activity has an anti-ageing effect at the cellular level, a German study suggests. Researchers focused on telomeres, the protective caps on the chromosomes that keep a cell's DNA stable but shorten with age. They found telomeres shortened less quickly in key immune cells of athletes with a long history of endurance training.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

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