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December 19, 2007

Green tea may halve prostate cancer risk: Japanese study
Drinking five or more cups of green tea a day could halve the risks of developing advanced prostate cancer, according to a Japanese study published Wednesday.
Read AFP news agency report at google.com

December 13, 2007

L-carnitine linked to better mental function in the very old
Supplements of L-carnitine improved total muscle mass and boosted cognitive performance among a group of centenarians in Italy, reports a new study. Sixty-six subjects over 100 years of age took part in the study, published in this month's American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, which also reports reductions in fat mass and fatigue during the placebo-controlled, randomised, double-blind, 2-phase study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Omega-3 shows benefits for fat loss in diabetics
Supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids could reduce fat mass in diabetics, as well as improving blood lipid levels associated with the formation of arterial plaque, suggests a new study from France.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 11, 2007

Med diet linked to longer life – study
Eating a Mediterranean-style diet, rich in fruit, vegetables, olive oil and fish, may reduce the risk of dying from cancer and cardiovascular disease, says a new US study. A study of almost 400,000 people with an age range of 50 to 71 reports that greater adherence to a Med-style diet reduced the risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer by 22 and 17 per cent in men, and 12 per cent for women.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 7, 2007

Folate may reduce depression symptoms for men, says study
Increased intake of folate may reduce the incidence of depression amongst men by 50 per cent, suggests a new study of over 500 Japanese subjects.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 4, 2007

Honey is better than children's cough syrups for a silent night
Natural honey is a more effective remedy for children's coughs than over-the-counter medicines, researchers say. A dose of buckwheat honey before bedtime easily outperformed a cough suppressant in a US study. Honey did a better job of reducing the severity and frequency of night-time coughs. It also improved sleep quality for children and their parents.
Read article in The Times (UK)

December 4, 2007

Indian herb's diabetes benefits gets study boost
Supplements of the Indian herbal Coccinia indica may reduce blood sugar levels by about 20 per cent, says a new study from India that adds to the Indian herb linked potential to aid diabetics. A one gram daily dose of C. indica extract led to an 18 per cent reduction in blood sugar levels after meals, according to a double blind, placebo control, randomised study published in the journal Diabetes Care.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 3, 2007

Scientists find super fruits key to mouth cancer
SUPER fruits like blueberries, blackberries and papaya could be used to stop mouth cancer cells spreading through the rest of the body. They could also reduce the risk of mouth cancer, according to research published in the Journal of Cancer Research. The study, carried out at the University of Hong Kong, found that as well as suppressing the spread of cancer, a substance called lupeol found in blueberries and other "super fruit" also reduced the size of the tumour three times faster than conventional drugs.
Read article at icwales.co.uk (UK)

December 3, 2007

Study gives vitamin K anti-inflammation boost
Increased intake of vitamin K1, and to a lesser extend vitamin D, could protect against inflammation, and positively effect chronic disease risk, suggests a new observational study. The study, published on-line in the American Journal of Epidemiology, adds to in vitro data supporting benefits for the vitamins against inflammation, brought about by an over-expression or lack of control of the normal protective mechanism. Chronic inflammation has been linked to range of conditions linked to heart disease, osteoporosis, cognitive decline and Alzheimer's, and type-2 diabetes.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 30, 2007

Whirlwind around stevia could also include DNA protection
Stevia, the natural sweetener causing a whirlwind of interest around the globe, could also be a rich source of antioxidants and may protect against DNA damage and cancer, says a study from India published yesterday. An extract from Stevia rebaudiana leaves was found to contain an abundance of antioxidant polyphenols, including quercitrin, apigenin, and kaempferol. Subsequent tests showed that the extract could protect against DNA strand scission by hydroxide radicals, states the report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 29, 2007

Multivitamins and minerals benefits for weight and hunger
Multivitamins and minerals could reduce appetite in women on a weight reduction regime, while lower body weight and fat mass was more obvious in men, says new research from Canada. The study adds to the body of evidence supporting adequate vitamin and mineral consumption for health, and is published in the British Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 28, 2007

Zinc may boost cancer patients survival
A study has linked zinc supplements to boosting recovery in patients suffering from head and neck cancers. Writing in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology and Physics scientists noted a difference between two groups of cancer patient's recovery rates over three years.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 26, 2007

Vitamin E boost for diabetics' heart health
Vitamin E supplements may halve the risk of cardiovascular events among diabetics, if they carry a particular version of a gene, says new research from Israel.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 22, 2007

Flavonoids linked to better breast cancer survival
An increased dietary intake of flavonoids may enhance breast cancer survival by over 30 per cent, suggests a new epidemiological study from the US. The study of 1,210 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer found that individuals with the highest intake of flavones and isoflavones prior to diagnosis had a 37 and 48 per cent lower risk of all-cause mortality.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 20, 2007

Pine bark extract shows arthritis benefits
Extracts from French maritime pine bark may reduce the pain and stiffness associated with arthritis of the knee by about 40 per cent, suggests a new international study. Moreover, the randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 37 patients with osteoarthritis and using the pine bark extract, Pycnogenol, indicated an improvement in physical function of 52 per cent. The study is published in the journal Nutrition Research.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

November 20, 2007

Regular exercise reduces risk of blood clots
According to a new study published in Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, regular participation in sports reduces the risk of developing blood clots by 39 percent in women and 22 percent in men.
Read article at physorg.com

November 15, 2007

Low dose grape powder linked to colon protection
Low doses of freeze-dried grape powder could inhibit the development of colorectal cancer, suggests a new human pilot study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 15, 2007

Milk thistle compound may protect against liver cancer
A flavanone compound in milk thistle, silibinin, may stop the growth and spread of liver cancer, suggests a laboratory study from the University of California, Irvine.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 14, 2007

Global view shows link between endometrial cancer and Vitamin D status
Using newly available data on worldwide cancer incidence, researchers at the Moores Cancer Center at University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have shown a clear association between deficiency in exposure to sunlight, specifically ultraviolet B (UVB), and endometrial cancer. UVB exposure triggers photosynthesis of vitamin D3 in the body. This form of vitamin D is also available through diet and supplements. Previous studies from this research team have shown associations between higher levels of vitamin D3 and lower risk of cancers of the breast, colon, kidney and ovary.
Read article at physorg.com

November 13, 2007

Citrus juice, vitamin C give staying power to green tea antioxidants
To get more out of your next cup of tea, just add juice. A study found that citrus juices enable more of green tea's unique antioxidants to remain after simulated digestion, making the pairing even healthier than previously thought. The study compared the effect of various beverage additives on catechins, naturally occurring antioxidants found in tea. Results suggest that complementing green tea with either citrus juices or vitamin C likely increases the amount of catechins available for the body to absorb.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: The concept of nutrient synergy, as pioneered by Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki, maximises the health benefits of micronutrients because of the discovery that they work best in teams. However, whilst the study reported above is certainly interesting, Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki's research has gone far beyond it and has now proven the benefits of green tea extract in combination with specific cellular nutrients in about 30 different cancers. These combinations of nutrients, especially vitamin C, lysine, proline, green tea extract and others, work together and help stop the spread of cancer by controlling the tumor growth, angiogenesis, apoptosis, inflammations, and activity of collagen-digestive enzymes.

November 13, 2007

Oils may cut Alzheimer's risk
Eating a diet rich in omega-3 oils such as rapeseed, flaxseed and walnut oil could reduce the risk of suffering Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia by 60%, according to a study of more than 8,000 people. The study, published in the Journal of Neurology, also found that eating fruit and vegetables daily and fish at least once a week seems to protect against cognitive decline.
Read article in the Guardian (UK)

November 12, 2007

Long-term beta carotene supplementation may help prevent cognitive decline
Men who take beta carotene supplements for 15 years or longer may have less cognitive decline, according to a report in the November 12 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Read article at physorg.com

November 9, 2007

Topical Vitamin C Stops Basal Cell Carcinoma
The most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, often responds to a remarkably simple, safe, at-home treatment: vitamin C. Physicians and patients report that vitamin C, applied directly to basal cell skin cancers, causes them to scab over and drop off. Successful use involves a highly-concentrated vitamin C solution, directly applied to the blemish two or three times a day.
Read article at orthomolecular.org

November 8, 2007

'Runner's high' may also strengthen hearts
Endorphins and other morphine-like substances known as opioids, which are released during exercise, don't just make you feel good -- they may also protect you from heart attacks, according to University of Iowa researchers.
Read article at physorg.com

November 8, 2007

Vitamin D 'may help slow ageing'
A vitamin made when sunlight hits the skin could help slow down the ageing of cells and tissues, say researchers. A King's College London study of more than 2,000 women found those with higher vitamin D levels showed fewer ageing-related changes in their DNA.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: Professor Brent Richards, who led the study, said: "These results are exciting because they demonstrate for the first time that people who have higher levels of vitamin D may age more slowly than people with lower levels of vitamin D.

November 7, 2007

Exercise reverses damage in heart failure patients: study
Moderate exercise can help heart failure patients reverse some of the muscular damage that is a hallmark of the condition, according to two studies released Wednesday.
Read article at physorg.com

November 4, 2007

Onions 'cut heart disease risk'
Eating a meal rich in compounds called flavonoids reduces some early signs of heart disease, research shows. An Institute of Food Research team focused on one of the compounds, quercetin, which is found in tea, onions, apples and red wine. The Atherosclerosis study examined the effect of the compounds produced after quercetin is broken down by the body. They were shown to help prevent the chronic inflammation which can lead to thickening of the arteries.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

October 25, 2007

NUTRIENTS BOOST NATURAL ANTI-RETROVIRAL ENZYME IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS
A double-blind, randomized clinical trial has shown that HIV-positive patients given supplemental nutrients can stop their decline into AIDS. Edith Namulemia, James Sparling and Harold Foster's findings were just published in the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine.
Read news release at orthomolecular.org
Comment: For further information on the natural control of AIDS, click here.

October 25, 2007

Omega-3 to cut colon cancer: meta-analysis
A pooled analysis of the small but ever-growing body of science of omega-3 and colorectal cancer indicates more fish oil does protect against the cancer.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 25, 2007

Grapefruit juice gets anti-cancer fillip
Grapefruit juice and its active components, furocoumarins, may inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the activation of compounds into cancer-causing compounds, suggests new research from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 23, 2007

Onion compound linked to lower blood pressure
Quercitin, the compound most commonly associated with onions, may reduce blood pressure by an average of five millimitres of mercury, indicates new research. The study, said to be the first to report the blood pressure-lowering activity of this flavonol, found a daily 730 milligram supplement of quercitin led to significant reductions in the blood pressure of 22 people with high blood pressure (hypertension).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 22, 2007

Zinc may reduce pneumonia risk in nursing home elderly
When elderly nursing home residents contract pneumonia, it is a blow to their already fragile health. Simin Nikbin Meydani, DVM, PhD of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University and colleagues report that maintaining normal serum zinc concentration in the blood may help reduce the risk of pneumonia development in that population.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: The study participants with normal serum zinc concentrations in their blood reduced their risk of developing pneumonia by about 50 percent. Additionally, deaths from all causes were 39 percent lower in this group.

October 19, 2007

Vitamin K shows potential in the fight against wrinkles
Research suggests that vitamin K plays a role in protecting skin elasticity and may help protect against skin aging and the development of wrinkles.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

October 19, 2007

Vitamin E pills may cut heart disease risk in diabetics
Supplements of vitamin E may counteract complications in type-2 diabetics linked to an increased risk of heart disease, says a new study from Italy. Daily vitamin E supplements (500 International Units) were found to decrease levels of a protein associated with higher risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and ultimately cardiovascular disease in this study with 37 type-2 diabetics, published in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

October 18, 2007

Exposure to sunlight may decrease risk of advanced breast cancer by half
A research team from the Northern California Cancer Center, the University of Southern California, and Wake Forest University School of Medicine has found that increased exposure to sunlight – which increases levels of vitamin D in the body – may decrease the risk of advanced breast cancer. In a study reported online this week in the American Journal of Epidemiology, the researchers found that women with high sun exposure had half the risk of developing advanced breast cancer, which is cancer that has spread beyond the breast, compared to women with low sun exposure.
Read article at physorg.com

October 18, 2007

Pine bark extract boost for blood flow and heart health
Extracts from French maritime pine bark may boost the body's production of nitric oxide - key to better blood flow and oxygen supply to muscles - suggests a new study. The results of the new study, published in the October issue of the journal Hypertension Research, add to a growing body of research reporting potential health benefits of the pine bark extract, Pycnogenol.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 12, 2007

Green tea may halve prostate cancer risk
Drinking five cups of green tea a day may reduce the risk of prostate cancer by 48 per cent, reports a new study from Japan.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 8, 2007

Vitamin Supplements Help Protect Children from Heavy Metals, Reduce Behavioral Disorders
The ability of vitamin C to protect animals from heavy metal poisoning is well established. Recent controlled trials with yeast, fish, mice, rats, chickens, clams, guinea pigs, and turkeys all came to the same conclusion: Vitamin C protects growing animals from heavy metals poisoning. Benefits with an animal model do not always translate to equal benefits for humans. In this case, however, the benefit has been proven for a wide range of animals. The odds that vitamin C will protect human children are high. There is a virtual epidemic of behavior problems, learning disabilities, ADHD and autism, and the number of children receiving special education services continues to rise steeply. Although not all causes are yet identified, growing evidence suggests that heavy metal pollution is a significant factor, and vitamin C is part of the solution.
Read news release at orthomolecular.org

October 8, 2007

Folic acid supplements may slash arsenic levels
Supplements of folic acid may lower blood levels of arsenic in individuals exposed to the toxin in contaminated drinking water, researchers have suggested. The study, led by Mary Gamble from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, indicates that folic acid supplements may offer a means to reduce toxicity associated with arsenic exposure from drinking water - a significant public health problem in at least 70 countries, including several developing countries and parts of the U.S. "Although additional studies are needed, the results of this study suggest that a simple, low-cost nutritional intervention may help to prevent some of the long-term health consequences associated with arsenic exposure for the many populations at risk," said Gamble.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 8, 2007

Vitamin C and linoleic acid may slow skin ageing
Higher intakes of Vitamin C and linoleic acid are associated with better skin-ageing appearance, according to a recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 8, 2007

Garlic May Protect Against Colon Cancer
A research team from the University of South Australia examined studies from the last decade and found consistent scientific evidence that garlic may protect against development of colorectal cancer.
Read news at naturalproductsinsider.com

October 3, 2007

Vitamin D Boosts Health, Cuts Cancer Risk in Half
New research shows that getting plenty of vitamin D prolongs life and improves health. Vitamin D deficiency plays a role in causing seventeen varieties of cancer, as well as heart disease, stroke, hypertension, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, depression, chronic pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, muscle wasting, birth defects, and periodontal disease.
Read news release at orthomolecular.org

October 1, 2007

Apples and onions may slash pancreatic cancer risk
A diet rich in flavonols from foods such as onions, apples and berries may cut the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by about 25 per cent, a multi-ethnic study has reported. The results, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, indicate that the benefits may be even more pronounced amongst smokers, with a risk reduction of over 59 per cent.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 26, 2007

Omega-3 may reduce type-1 diabetes
An increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids from marine sources may reduce of children at risk of type-1 diabetes from developing the disease, suggests new research.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 25, 2007

Selenium may protect against artery furring
Selenium supplements may reduce the risk of heart disease by inhibiting the oxidation of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, suggests a small study from Italy.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 24, 2007

Tocotrienol may protect against DNA damage, says study
Tocotrienols, the less studied form of vitamin E, may reduce DNA damage, considered an important trigger in cancer development, by about 50 per cent, new research suggests.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 21, 2007

Omega-3 may boost blood vessel elasticity – study
Supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may improve the elasticity of blood vessels and improve overall cardiovascular health, reports a new study from China. The study, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, adds to an ever growing body of science linking omega-3 fatty acids with improved heart health, adding to previous reports on improved heart rhythms, reduced risk of a second heart attack, and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 17, 2007

Med diet found to benefit arthritis sufferers
Women suffering from arthritis who adhered to a Mediterranean diet for only nine months experienced "significant" alleviations in pain, according to a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 17, 2007

Apples could cut childhood asthma, study finds
Mothers who eat apples during pregnancy may help their child avoid the risk of asthma, a study has found.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 14, 2007

100 apples a day keeps URTI away
A flavonoid found in fruit, such as apples and berries, could help reduce illnesses in people who have carried out extensive exercise. Researchers writing in the Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise journal found that supplementation of quercetin reduced incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). This study adds to an increasing body of evidence pointing to the health benefits of the antioxidant, which has been linked to having an ability to fight oxidative stress as well as anti-cancer benefits.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

September 12, 2007

Pycnogenol could soothe ADHD symptoms
A soon-to-be published study has linked French maritime pine bark ingredient Pycnogenol to balancing stress hormones, in turn diminishing symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The research, set to be published in an upcoming issue of Nutritional Neuroscience, builds on previous studies linking the antioxidant ingredient to abating a host of conditions. The present study showed Pycnogenol lowered adrenaline by 26.2 percent and the neurostimulant dopamine by 10.8 percent. These hormones and stimulants affect processes and actions such as learning, cognition, attention and behaviour.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

September 12, 2007

Supplementation could help problem gamblers curb addiction
A common amino acid sold as a dietary supplement could help diminish pathological gambling addictions, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Minnesota (UM) uncovered the link following an eight-week trial involving 27 people who were given increasing doses of N-acetyl cysteine. By the end of the pilot study, published in the September 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry, 60 percent of the participants reported having less urges to gamble.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

September 12, 2007

Fish and 'fruity vegetables' may reduce asthma and allergies
A diet rich in vegetables, such as tomatoes and aubergines, and fish can help cut asthma and allergy incidence in children, a study suggests.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 11, 2007

Lutein/zeaxanthin again linked to lower AMD risk
Supplementing with lutein and zeaxanthin has once again been associated with a lower risk for age-related macular degeneration, according to a new report. Published in the September issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, the research was undertaken as part of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) - a major clinical trial sponsored by the National Eye Institute under the umbrella of the National Institutes of Health.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 11, 2007

Vitamin D increases life expectancy, study finds
An intriguing new study finds that those who take vitamin D supplements can increase their life expectancies by one to two years. The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, is just the latest to add to the growing body of evidence that "the sunshine vitamin" is not just good for strengthening bones but also appears to increase survival.
Read article on the CTV website (Canada)

September 11, 2007

Med diet found to have further Alzheimer's benefits
Adhering to a Mediterranean diet could allow sufferers of Alzheimer's disease to live longer than patients who eat a more traditional Western diet, according to new research published today. The findings are the latest in a string of health benefits linked to the eating plan of the people of southern Europe, which has in the past also been associated with the prevention of Alzheimers disease. Published in today's issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, the new findings were based on researchers' observations of 192 Alzheimer sufferers for four and a half years. During that time, 85 of the people died. Researchers found that those patients who most closely followed a Mediterranean diet were 76 percent less likely to die during the study period than those who followed the diet the least.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 10, 2007

Prevent Preeclampsia with Vitamin D?
Preeclampsia is a dangerous condition for pregnant women, often forcing women to deliver prematurely to protect her health and the baby's. Now, new research reveals women who don't get enough vitamin D early in their pregnancy may be at a higher risk of developing preeclampsia.
Read article at ivanhoe.com (USA)

September 6, 2007

Vitamin D could halve breast and colon cancer incidence
As many as 50 percent of breast and colon cancer cases could be prevented by increasing intake of vitamin D, according to a study that backs continued calls for higher upper limits of the ingredient.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: These findings confirm that vitamin D needs to be made more available to consumers through public awareness and increased upper limits. According to the study's projections, in North America, a 50 percent reduction in colon cancer incidence would require universal intake of 2000 IU (International Units) per day of vitamin D, and a 50 percent reduction in breast cancer would require 3500 IU per day. "These gradients for cancer risk suggest that the upper limit should be revised upward, since there is a considerable benefit, and no established adverse effect of vitamin D3 intake below 10,000 IU/d," wrote the study authors.

September 5, 2007

Exercise May Generate New Blood Vessels
Having a bad heart doesn't mean you can skip exercise, doctors said Wednesday. In fact, it may even help your heart to repair itself. Research presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting showed that exercise sparks the creation of new heart vessels. In a small study of 37 people at Leipzig University in Germany, Dr. Robert Hollriegel found that people with serious heart failure who rode a bike for up to 30 minutes a day for four months produced new stem cells in their bones. They also had more small blood vessels in their muscles. Those who didn't exercise had no change in their vessels or muscles.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: "People think that if they have heart failure, then they're at the end of the road and they can't exercise," said Dr. Freek Verheugt, a cardiologist at the University of Nymegen in the Netherlands. "But this study shows that exercise can work to produce new blood vessels, even in patients with serious heart disease."

September 5, 2007

Avocados May Help Prevent Oral Cancer, Study Shows
Nutrients taken from avocados are able to thwart oral cancer cells, killing some and preventing pre-cancerous cells from developing into actual cancers, according to researchers at Ohio State University.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

September 4, 2007

Nutrient Intake Influences Vaginosis Incidence
Higher intakes of certain nutrients, including folate, vitamin E and calcium, may reduce the incidence of severe bacterial vaginosis (BV) in women, while higher fat intake may raise BV incidence.
Read article at naturalproductsinsider.com

August 29, 2007

Study: Garlic may fight deadly cancer
Garlic can kill cells that cause glioblastoma, a brain cancer that is usually fatal, researchers in South Carolina have found.
Read article at physorg.com

August 24, 2007

Higher vitamin E doses may produce better results for heart
Increased doses of vitamin E may produce positive results for heart health, says a new study from the US that questions the 'under-dosing' used in earlier clinical trials. The study, published early online in Free Radical Biology and Medicine, reports that a higher dose – 3200 International Units – of vitamin E is needed to reduce oxidative stress in individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease, and this may be why previous trials using lower doses failed to show any benefits for the vitamin.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 24, 2007

Fracture And Bone Loss Risk Reduced If Older People Take Calcium Supplementation
People over the age of 50 who either take calcium supplementation alone, or along with vitamin D supplementation have a 12% lower risk of fracture or bone loss, compared to people who don't take them, says an article in The Lancet, this week's issue. Dr. Benjamin Tang, University of Western Sydney, Australia, and team carried out an analysis of 17 previous studies involving 52,625 people over the age of 50. They each received treatment for an average of 3.5 years. The researchers found that where patients were keeping to their dosing regimen correctly the risk of fracture was 24% lower. They also found that doses higher than 1200 mg lowered fracture risk more, compared to doses of under 1200mg. Protection from fracture was also greater when Vitamin D was also taken at doses of 800 international units (IU) or more, compared to lower doses.
Read article at medicalnewstoday.com

August 23, 2007

Vitamin K linked to fewer varicose veins, better vascular health
Inactivation of a vitamin K-dependent protein may contribute to the development of varicose veins, says a new study that highlights the role of supplementation for improving vascular health.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 21, 2007

Study Shines More Light On Benefit Of Vitamin D In Fighting Cancer
A new study looking at the relationship between vitamin D serum levels and the risk of colon and breast cancer across the globe has estimated the number of cases of cancer that could be prevented each year if vitamin D3 levels met the target proposed by researchers. Cedric F. Garland, Dr.P.H., cancer prevention specialist at the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and colleagues estimate that 250,000 cases of colorectal cancer and 350,000 cases of breast cancer could be prevented worldwide by increasing intake of vitamin D3, particularly in countries north of the equator.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

August 20, 2007

Darker fruits could fight cancer
The compounds which give certain fruit and vegetables their dark colour may contain powerful cancer fighting properties, US research suggests. Studies on rats and human cells found anthocyanins – which colour red, purple and blue fruits – notably slowed the growth of colon cancer cells. The more exotic the plant the better: purplecorn and bilberry were found to be much more potent than the radish.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

August 17, 2007

Vitamin C: A Highly Effective Treatment for Colds
A recent and well-publicized review of vitamin C by the Cochrane Collaboration has resulted in much misguided discussion in the popular press. There are important facts that emerge from the review. At least 30 controlled clinical trials (many double-blind and placebo-controlled) involving a total of over 11,000 participants have been conducted. Vitamin C in doses ranging from 200 mg to 2,000 mg per day (the dosage range used in a large majority of the studies) reduces the duration of colds by 7% for adults and 15% for children. The data indicates that there is a normal dose-response relationship. Vitamin C is more effective the higher the dose. The most effective doses are far more than 2,000 mg/day. Exclusion of higher-dose studies because they were not placebo controlled is not justified.
Read news release at orthomolecular.org

August 16, 2007

Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Zinc Reduce AMD Incidence
High intake of some antioxidants was associated with a reduced risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, different nutrients affected different risk factors.
Read article at naturalproductsinsider.com

August 16, 2007

Omega-3 plus vitamins may prevent bed sores in hospitals
Bed sores, which afflict up to one-tenth of hospital patients, may be prevented by adding key supplements to a standard hospital diet, reports new research from Israel.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 10, 2007

Omega-3 DHA improves blood lipid levels – study
Men with high blood levels of triglycerides, a risk factor for artery hardening, may benefit from supplements of the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 9, 2007

Green tea may stop colon cancer in its tracks – study
Green tea may stop the growth of colon tumours in their infancy, suggests a new study using mice, but merely drinking green tea offers no benefits against larger tumours. If the study, published in the journal Carcinogenesis, can be translated to humans, then this could have implications for the beverage and its extracts as a preventative against colon cancer.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: Further evidence that Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki have been right all along.

August 8, 2007

Thiamine may improve vascular health for diabetics
Supplements of thiamine may boost vascular health for diabetics, English scientists have suggested after their research indicated that low levels of the B vitamin may be key to a range of vascular problems. Writing in the journal Diabetologia, lead researcher Paul Thornalley from the University of Warwick reports that thiamine concentration in blood plasma was decreased by about 75 per cent in both type 1 and 2 diabetics. "The deficiency of thiamine in clinical diabetes may increase the fragility of vascular cells to the adverse effects of hyperglycaemia and thereby increase the risk of developing microvascular complications," wrote Thornalley. "Correction of the low plasma thiamine concentration with thiamine supplements may decrease the risk of microvascular complications in diabetes," he added.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 8, 2007

Omega-3 again linked to calmer ADHD kids
High-dose supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids calmed children with attention and hyperactivity issues, says a new study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 8, 2007

Support for Med diet's heart benefits keeps growing
Consuming a Mediterranean-style diet, rich in fruit, vegetables and fish, may reduce the risk of dieing from cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 30 per cent, says Australia's largest study of eating habits.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 6, 2007

Olive extract may improve quality of life for arthritis sufferers
Supplementation with an olive extract decreased pain and inflammation, and improved the quality of life of people suffering from osteoarthritis, claims a new study. Writing in the new issue of the journal Nutrition Research, researchers from Arizona State University and California-based company CreAgri report that the supplements also had the added benefit of decreasing homocysteine levels, a marker of improved cardiovascular health. "An 8-week treatment with olive extract improved daily living activities in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and significantly reduced plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine levels in patients with and rheumatoid arthritis (RA)," wrote lead author Catherine Bitler.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 5, 2007

Sunshine cuts risk of breast cancer
Sunshine could help women in the fight against breast cancer, according to new research. For years, experts have warned that spending too much time in the sun can increase the risk of developing skin cancer. But now it seems that women who avoid sunlight altogether are putting themselves at greater risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer. The majority of vitamin D comes from exposure of the skin to sunlight but many women – exposed less in winter and reluctant to bare themselves in summer because of the dangers – are deficient. There has been anecdotal evidence to suggest that breast cancer is less common among women who live closer to the Equator, where the sunshine is stronger. But a new study provides the firmest evidence yet that the lower the levels of vitamin D in a woman's blood-stream, the greater the risk of her developing breast cancer if she has passed the menopause. Of more than 1,000 women who took part in a trial, those who were given both calcium and vitamin D supplements had less than half the chance of developing breast cancer than those given a placebo.
Read article at scotsman.com (Scotland/UK)

August 3, 2007

Multivitamins and minerals may boost mood in elderly
A daily multivitamin and mineral supplement may improve depressive symptoms amongst the elderly, suggests a new trial from the University of Sheffield. Writing in the journal Clinical Nutrition, Salah Gariballa and Sarah Forster report that regular supplementation of hospitalised older people with multivitamins and minerals improved mental health, compared to placebo. "This trial has demonstrated that nutritional supplementation of hospitalised older people does lead to a clinically important benefit," wrote the researchers. "Widespread implementation of this strategy taking into account patients preference, life-style and socioeconomic circumstances could have a substantial economic impact and improve mental health for older people," they added.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 31, 2007

Coenzyme study backs heart health claims
Supplementation with the coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) may boost naturally occurring antioxidant enzymes and endothelial function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), researchers have found. The randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial, published in the European Heart Journal, is yet another positive result for CoQ10 and its heart health benefits.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 28, 2007

Sunshine 'protective' against MS
People who spend more time in the sun as children subsequently have a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), a US study shows. The University of Southern California team suggest UV rays offer protection by altering the cell immune responses or by boosting vitamin D levels. An earlier study found women who took vitamin D supplements were 40% less likely to develop MS.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

July 27, 2007

Antioxidants linked to better bone health for osteoarthritis
Increased intake of fruit and the antioxidants they contain, like vitamins C and E, may improve bone health and may reduce the risk of osteoarthritis. "Our study suggests a beneficial effect of vitamin C intake on the reduction in bone size and the number of bone marrow lesions, both which are important in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis," wrote lead author Yuanyuan Wang from Monash University.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 27, 2007

Broccoli and cauliflower may slash prostate cancer risk
Eating more than one serving of broccoli and cauliflower a week may reduce the risk of prostate cancer by up to 45 per cent, says a new study.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

July 26, 2007

Zeaxanthin linked to better mental performance in the elderly
Increased intake of the carotenoids lycopene and zeaxanthin may improve the mental performance of the elderly, according to a new study from France.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 26, 2007

Anthocyanins' anti-inflammatory properties probed
Increased intake of anthocyanins – compounds behind the red and blue colour of berries and other fruit – from dietary or supplemental sources may protect against inflammation, says a new study from Norway.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 25, 2007

Low vitamin D levels linked to higher blood pressure
People with low blood levels of vitamin D may be at an increased risk of higher blood pressure – a problem that could be easily remedied with supplements, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 25, 2007

Folate May Improve Liver Health
Individuals who consume a low-folate diet may have an increased risk of developing liver cancer, a new study has found.
Read report at vrp.com (USA)

July 19, 2007

Researchers find grapes help prevent heart disease
Eating a bunch of grapes could be even healthier than originally thought. Researchers with the Department of Primary Industries in Victoria say eating fresh grapes can compare to drinking red wine in moderation, in an effort to prevent heart disease.
Read report at ABC Online (Australia)

July 16, 2007

Better B6 status linked to better pregnancy outcomes
High levels of vitamin B6 prior to falling pregnant may boost conception rates and reduce the odds of losing the baby during early pregnancy, suggests new research.
Read report at nutraingredients.com

July 13, 2007

Horny Goatweed linked to better bone health
Flavonoids derived from the Chinese herb Epimedium may increase bone mineral density (BMD) at the hip and lower back, and may have benefits against osteoporosis, suggests a new study. The herb, also known as Horny Goatweed, is most commonly associated with sexual health with numerous species of Epimedium reported to be aphrodisiacs. Results of a new 24-month randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial suggest that Epimedium brevicornum maxim may also have benefits for bone health, with supplementation resulting in increases in BMD of about 1.5 per cent after two years, while placebo led to weakening of the bones.
Read report at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 11, 2007

Meso-Zeaxanthin Aids Eyes
A supplement of meso-zeaxanthin may bolster macular pigment optical density (MPOD), according to researchers from Florida International University.
Read report at naturalproductsinsider.com (USA)

July 10, 2007

Fishy, fruity diet may cut asthma risk – study
A diet rich in fruit, vitamins C and E, and omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of respiratory conditions like asthma, chronic bronchitic symptoms, and wheeze says a new study. The research, published in this month's issue of the journal Chest, adds to a growing body of science supporting that a healthy diet rich in anti-oxidants and vitamins is good for asthma. "Our study, as well as other research, suggests that higher intakes of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory micronutrients are associated with lower reports of cough, respiratory infections, and less severe asthma-related symptoms," said lead author Jane Burns, from Harvard School of Public Health.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 9, 2007

Pumpkin: A fairytale end to insulin injections?
Compounds found in pumpkin could potentially replace or at least drastically reduce the daily insulin injections that so many diabetics currently have to endure. Recent research reveals that pumpkin extract promotes regeneration of damaged pancreatic cells in diabetic rats, boosting levels of insulin-producing beta cells and insulin in the blood, reports Lisa Richards in Chemistry & Industry, the magazine of the SCI.
Read article at physorg.com

July 9, 2007

Vitamin D, calcium boost bone health after fractures – study
Supplementation with vitamin and calcium could cut reduce bone loss in patients with recent osteoporotic fractures, suggests a new study from Denmark. Writing in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers from Copenhagen University Hospital and Roskilde University Hospital report that supplementation with the vitamin and mineral approximately halved levels of a hormone associated with bone turnover. "Supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is important for patients with low-energy fractures because it decreases bone loss," wrote lead author Mette Hitz. "The effect of intervention was positively related to physical performance, which emphasizes the importance of mobilisation."
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 6, 2007

More support for carotenoids for eye health
Supplementation with meso-zeaxanthin, an unusual and consequently rare isomer of zeaxanthin, may offer protection against age-related macular degeneration. "We have shown for the first time that meso-zeaxanthin is absorbed into the serum following ingestion," wrote lead author Richard Bone from Florida International University. "The data indicate that a supplement containing predominantly meso-zeaxanthin is generally effective at raising macular pigment density, and may turn out to be a useful addition to the defenses against AMD," he added.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 4, 2007

Eat cherries to keep cancer away, says a study
Cherries, the fleshy fruit may soon become an important weapon in the ongoing quest to fight cancer. A review of research on the fruit's health benefits has found that fresh sweet cherries are loaded with a compound called cyanidin, part of a family of antioxidants called anthocyanins. Together, these compounds help combat the cell-damaging effects of "free radicals", which may lead to the development of cancer and a host of age-related illnesses.
Read article in The Hindu (India)

Vitamin D levels may affect heart health – study
Increasing levels of vitamin D could boost heart health, says a large study from the US that also calls for studies to assess a direct benefit of vitamin supplements.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 3, 2007

Pomegranate juice may ease erectile dysfunction
A glass of pomegranate juice every day may help manage erectile dysfunction, suggest results from a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover pilot study. Writing in the International Journal of Impotence Research, researchers from The Male Clinic, Beverly Hills, and University of California, Los Angeles report that 47 per cent of subjects reported erections improvements as a result of pomegranate juice, compared to only 32 per cent in the placebo group.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

More support for Med diet's heart benefits
Consuming a Mediterranean-style diet, rich in fruit, vegetables and fish, may decrease oxidative damage to LDL cholesterol and protect against coronary heart disease, suggests a new study. The research, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, adds to an ever-growing list of research supporting the health benefits of consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet (TMD), with evidence linking the diet to lower incidence of heart disease, obesity and certain types of cancers.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

July 2, 2007

Vitamin D, calcium may prevent, improve diabetes
Combined supplementation with vitamin D and calcium may improve blood sugar and insulin levels, suggests a new meta-analysis and review.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 25, 2007

Echinacea 'can prevent a cold'
Taking the herbal remedy echinacea can more than halve the risk of catching a common cold, US researchers say. They found it decreased the odds of developing a cold by 58% and the duration of colds by a day-and-a-half.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: In one of the 14 studies the researchers reviewed, echinacea was taken alongside vitamin C. This combination reduced cold incidence by 86%.

June 22, 2007

Omega-3 again linked to Alzheimers protection
Supplements of omega-3 fatty acids may help combat the depression and agitation symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease, says a new clinical trial. The randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, with 174 patients with Alzheimers is yet another positive result for the fatty acids in relation to cognitive function. Last year the same researchers reported omega- may slow mental decline in people with very mild Alzheimer's disease (Archives of Neurology, Vol. 63, pp. 1402-1408).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 19, 2007

Blackcurrants can protect from heart disease, cancer
Blackcurrants contain the highest level of health boosting antioxidants which could protect from a range of illnesses -- from heart disease to cancer -- shows latest research.
Read article at indiaenews.com

Rose-hips 'could treat rheumatoid arthritis'
Rose-hips may provide an effective treatment for sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

June 15, 2007

Astaxanthin linked to improved heart health
Astaxanthin, the nutrient that gives salmon its pink colour, may also have heart health benefits, suggests a new study from Finland . Results from the randomised, double-blind study, published in the International Journal of Vitamin and Nutrition Research, indicated that a daily supplement of the carotenoid, alone or in combination with omega-3, reduced plasma hydroxyl fatty acids levels, indicating that astaxanthin protects sensitive fatty acids from oxidation. "We propose that astaxanthin supplementation may decrease in vivo lipid peroxidation in healthy men," wrote lead author Jouni Karppi from the University of Kuopio.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 13, 2007

The old wives' tale is true...a dose of cod liver oil does work
A DAILY dose of cod liver oil could reduce feelings of depression, new research suggests. The supplement – hailed as a superfood for generations – has been found to reduce the risk of getting the blues by as much as 30 per cent. And the longer that subjects took cod liver oil, the greater the impact on their mental health. While those who had it for only five months saw their risk of depression drop slightly, subjects who took it for a year slashed their risk of depression by more than a quarter.
Read article in the Daily Express (UK)

Can DHA during pregnancy reduce problems for kids?
Supplementation of women with the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) during pregnancy could boost the problem solving abilities of the children, suggests new research. The research adds to our understanding of how omega-3 play an important role in the development of the baby in utero, with a wealth of other studies reporting that a diet rich in the DHA omega-3 fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid) during pregnancy and breastfeeding is associated with a healthy pregnancies as well as the mental and visual development of infants.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 8, 2007

Vitamin D vital for cancer prevention, researchers
A growing body of scientists believes that most Americans and Europeans do not receive enough vitamin D, and according to the latest study this could be putting them at a significant risk of developing cancer. Researchers from the Creighton University School of Medicine, in the United States found during a study of 1,179 healthy, postmenopausal women that those taking large amounts of vitamin D3 in conjunction with calcium had a 60 per cent or higher chance of not getting cancer than their peers. The women, from rural Nebraska, supplemented their diet for four years with calcium and a quantity of vitamin D3 nearly three times the US government's recommended daily amount (RDA) for middle-age adults. "The findings are very exciting," said Joan Lappe, the study's lead researcher. "They confirm what a number of vitamin D proponents have suspected for some time but that, until now, have not been substantiated through clinical trial. Vitamin D is a critical tool in fighting cancer as well as many other diseases."
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 7, 2007

Vitamin D linked to reduced cancer risk; Cancer Society advises supplements
Canadian adults should consider taking a specific amount of vitamin D, says the Canadian Cancer Society, basing its new recommendation on an expanding body of evidence linking the vitamin to reduced risk for colorectal, breast and prostate cancers. The recommendation coincides with the publication Friday of a study in a U.S. journal which found that taking vitamin D supplements and calcium substantially reduced all cancer risk in post-menopausal women. The four-year study, conducted by researchers at Creighton University in Nebraska, initially enrolled 1,180 women who were over the age of 55 and living in a nine-county rural area of the state. Of the 1,024 who completed the trial, those randomly assigned to take calcium and vitamin D and who had higher levels of both in their blood were 77 per cent less likely to develop cancer after the first year compared to those taking placebos or calcium alone. The Canadian Cancer Society released its recommendation Friday for adults in Canada to consider taking a vitamin D supplement of 1,000 international units daily during fall and winter.
Read article at canada.com

Green tea drinking may halve the colorectal cancer risk
Regularly drinking antioxidant-rich green tea may halve the risk of colon and rectal cancer, suggests a new study based in China . The results add to an ever-growing body of science linking consumption to a wide range of health benefits, including lower risk of certain cancers, increased weight loss, improved heart health, and protection against Alzheimer's.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 5, 2007

Ginseng could relieve cancer-related fatigue
Ginseng may help patients suffering from cancer-related fatigue, according to researchers based at Mayo Clinic, Rochester , US . Researchers with the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) have suggested that patients who take high doses of a form of American ginseng suffer less from fatigue that their peers.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Researchers recommend apple peel to protect against cancer
Apple peel may be more nutritious than apple flesh for people trying to keep cancer at bay, according to researchers at the Cornell Institute, New York , US . Researchers from Cornell claim to have identified a dozen compounds called triterpenoids in apple peel that either inhibited or killed cancer cells in laboratory cultures. "We found that several compounds have potent anti-proliferative activities against human liver, colon and breast cancer cells and may be partially responsible for the anti-cancer activities of whole apples," said Rui Hai Liu, Cornell associate professor of food science.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 4, 2007

Folic acid seen to reduce stroke risk
Folic acid supplementation is best known as a means of protecting unborn children against birth defects, but research suggests that it could also be beneficial to adults and significantly reduce their risk of suffering a stroke. A meta analysis published this week in The Lancet concludes that people can cut their risk of a stroke by a fifth by increasing their intake of folic acid. Xiaobin Wang from the Children's Memorial Research Center in the US and colleagues analysed data from eight randomised trials looking at the link between intake of folic acid and the risk of suffering a stroke. They found that people who regularly took a supplement of folic acid reduced their relative risk of stroke by an average of 18 per cent. An even greater risk reduction of 30 per cent was seen when the treatment lasted more than 36 months; if the individual had no past history of stroke, folic acid supplementation reduced their risk by 25 per cent.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

May 31, 2007

Green tea extract may boost blood vessel health
The heart healthy reputation of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main extract from green tea, may be due in part to improvement in blood flow through the vessels, suggests a clinical trial from the US . "EGCG acutely improves endothelial function in humans with coronary artery disease, and may account for a portion of the beneficial effects of flavonoid-rich food on endothelial function," wrote the authors in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 28, 2007

Vitamin D and calcium may lower breast cancer risk
Young women who consume higher amounts of calcium and vitamin D may have a lower risk of developing breast cancer, a new study shows.
Read article at cancerfacts.com

Apple juice 'may prevent asthma'
Children who drink plenty of apple juice may be less likely to develop asthma symptoms, say scientists. The National Heart and Lung Institute research, published in the European Respiratory Journal, is the latest study to link apples and lung health. Children who drank apple juice at least once a day were half as likely to suffer from wheezing as those drinking it less than once a month, it found.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

Cruciferous veg may cut bladder cancer risk
Increased intake of cruciferous vegetables may slash the risk of bladder cancer by 30 per cent, says new research that lays the benefits at the feet of the isothiocyanate content. Epidemiological and animal studies have shown that diets high in cruciferous vegetables result in less instances of certain cancers, especially lung, colon, breast and ovarian cancer, but no study has yet to report risk reductions against bladder cancer, said the researchers. "This is the first epidemiological report that isothiocyanates from cruciferous vegetable consumption protect against bladder cancer," wrote lead author Hua Zhao from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Spinach eaters may have lower ovarian cancer risk
Burly sailors like Popeye may not be the only ones to benefits from spinach, with new research suggesting that women who eat spinach may have a lower risk of ovarian cancer than women who don't. New research, published in the International Journal of Cancer, reports that increased intake of the flavonoid kaempferol, found in spinach and some cabbages, was associated with a 40 per cent reduced risk of ovarian cancer.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 24, 2007

Apple extract may reduce fatigue for sporty types
An apple polyphenol extract from unripe apples reduced symptoms of fatigue and improved physical performance during exercise, Japanese researchers have reported.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 23, 2007

Fish oil plus exercise linked to weight loss
A combination of fish oil supplements and exercise led to reductions in fat mass by about 1.5 kg, as well as improving heart health markers, says a new study from Australia. The study adds to an ever-growing list of potential health benefits from the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, identified as one of the super-nutrients taking the food and supplements industry by storm. Much of its healthy reputation that is seeping into consumer consciousness is based largely on evidence that it can aid cognitive function, may help protect the heart against cardiovascular disease, and could reduce the risk of certain cancers.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

Review Finds Key Nutrients Reduce Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration
A review from the Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, National Eye Institute and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has found that vitamins C, E, beta-carotene and zinc reduce the risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and that supplements containing these nutrients are appropriate for individuals with intermediate AMD or advanced AMD in one eye. Furthermore, the review also found that lutein, zeaxanthin and omega-3 fatty acids also play a role in reducing the risk of AMD.
Read article at vrp.com (USA)

May 22, 2007

Fish oil urged for heart patients
Doctors are being advised to prescribe oily fish or omega-3 fatty acid supplements to heart attack patients. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) believes this is an effective way to cut the risk of further heart attacks.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

May 20, 2007

Pre-birth apples 'benefit babies'
Children of mothers who eat plenty of apples during pregnancy are less likely to develop asthma, research suggests. The University of Aberdeen project quizzed 2,000 mums-to-be on their eating habits, then looked at their child's health over five years. They found that those who ate four or more apples a week were half as likely to have an asthmatic child compared with those who ate one or fewer. The study was presented at the American Thoracic Society conference. The researchers also found a link between eating more fish in pregnancy, and a lower chance of their child developing the allergic skin condition eczema.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: The project, funded by the charity Asthma UK, has previously revealed links between vitamin consumption in pregnancy and lower levels of asthma.

May 18, 2007

Lipoic Acid Explored As Anti-aging Compound
Researchers announced they have identified the mechanism of action of lipoic acid, a remarkable compound that in animal experiments appears to slow down the process of aging, improve blood flow, enhance immune function and perform many other functions. The findings, discussed at the "Diet and Optimum Health" conference sponsored by the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, shed light on how this micronutrient might perform such a wide range of beneficial functions.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

Pine bark extract shows promise against heart failure
Extracts from French maritime pine bark may protect against heart failure, if a new study with mice can be translated into humans. The results of the new study, published on-line in the journal Cardiovascular Toxicology, add to a growing body of research reporting potential health benefits of the pine bark extract, Pycnogenol. "We propose that a therapeutic effect of Pycnogenol may help to limit cardiac remodeling in patients predisposed to congestive heart failure - such as in the aged," wrote lead author Sherma Zibadi from the University of Arizona.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

May 15, 2007

Med diet 'cuts lung disease risk'
Eating a Mediterranean diet halves the risk of serious lung disease like emphysema and bronchitis, a study says.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

May 14, 2007

Higher intake of fish and vitamin D levels linked to lower risk of age-related macular disease
Individuals who have higher dietary intake of foods with omega-3 fatty acids and higher fish consumption have a reduced risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration, while those with higher serum levels of vitamin D may have a reduced risk of the early stages of the disease, according to two reports in the May issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.
Read article at physorg.com

May 13, 2007

Vitamin D 'may help ward off TB'
A dose of vitamin D may help ward off tuberculosis, research suggests. A study of 131 people found the vitamin helped to boost the ability of the body to inhibit the growth of bacteria that causes the respiratory disease.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: This study adds to a growing body of evidence about the health benefits of vitamin D - it has also been linked to reducing the risk of cancer and diabetes as well as strengthening the bones.

May 2, 2007

South African herbs may offer blood pressure benefits
The flora of South Africa is increasingly being studied as a source of novel nutraceuticals, and Tulbaghia violacea (wild garlic) may find a role in helping to lower blood pressure, researchers told the 120th annual meeting of the American Physiological Society. Researcher Irene Mackraj from the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, Durban told attendees in Washington D.C., that a study of 16 plants native to the Kwa-Zulu Natal region showed that half of these could find a role in reducing elevated blood pressure (hypertension).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 30, 2007

EGCG from tea may prevent arthritis - study
Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) extracted from green tea may inhibit the production of inflammatory molecules associated with and joint damage in people with rheumatoid arthritis, scientists have reported.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 27, 2007

Echinacea May Support Immunity in Athletes
Echinacea purpurea may support respiratory health in athletes, attenuating the normal drop in mucosal immunity associated with exercise.
Read article at naturalproductsinsider.com

Black cohosh may halve breast cancer risk – study
Women taking supplements of black cohosh may cut their risk of breast cancer by more than 50 per cent, suggests an epidemiological study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 25, 2007

Flavonols may help ward off pancreatic cancer
A look at the eating patterns of 183,518 California and Hawaii residents has found evidence that a diet high in flavonols might help ward off pancreatic cancer. Flavonols are found in plant-based foods with onions, apples, berries, kale, and broccoli having the highest concentrations. During an average of 8 years, 529 subjects developed pancreatic cancer. People who had the largest amount of flavonols in their diet -- measured with a "food frequency" questionnaire -- had a 23-percent lower risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared with people with the lowest levels, Dr. Ute Nöthlings from the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke reported at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Los Angeles.
Read article at reuters.com

April 23, 2007

Antioxidant found in many foods and red wine is potent and selective killer of leukemia cells
A naturally occurring compound found in many fruits and vegetables as well as red wine, selectively kills leukemia cells in culture while showing no discernible toxicity against healthy cells, according to a study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. These findings, which were published online March 20 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and will be in press on May 4, offer hope for a more selective, less toxic therapy for leukemia.
Read article at physorg.com

April 20, 2007

Better omega-3 to omega-6 ratio could reduce depression study
Improving the ration of omega-3 to omega-6 in the diet may improve mood and reduce depression, suggests a new study. Researchers from Ohio State University took blood samples from 43 older adults (average age 67) and calculated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) levels and compared these to levels of markers of inflammation, and found that people with high ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 were more likely to suffer depression and inflammatory diseases.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 18, 2007

Selenium may fight prostate cancer
A U.S. study suggests selenium might offer an intervention strategy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Yan Hu of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute said selenium, an effective chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer, has been found to down-regulate interleukin-6, of IL-6 -- a cytokine that induces the progression of the spread of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.
Read article at LEF Daily News

April 17, 2007

Clinical trial boosts omega-3's ADHD benefit claims
Omega-3 supplementation of children with learning and behavioural problems led to significant improvements, adding important data to this high profile subject.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 16, 2007

More Evidence Proving Vegetables Prevent Cancer
Even more evidence is coming out about the cancer fighting benefits of vegetables. The most recent study took place in the United States. The study used half a million retired Americans to see how vegetables helped reduce the risk of developing cancer. The study is more evidence to support the eating enough vegetables theories. The results of the study on American retirees showed that by increasing the intake of vegetables or fruit by just one serving more per day, decreased a person's risk of developing cancers in the neck and head.
Read article at associatedcontent.com

April 12, 2007

Fish Oil Helps Immune System Mature
Known to boost immune function in adults, fish oil supplementation has shown value in helping the immune system mature in infants, according to recent study results published in the April issue of the Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at naturalproductsinsider.com (USA)

April 11, 2007

Studies champion omega-3s for slowing mental decline
Increased bloods levels of the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA could "postpone" age-related cognitive decline that may precede dementia and Alzheimer's disease, suggest two new studies.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 5, 2007

Med diet helps kids breathe easier – study
Getting children to consume a Mediterranean-style diet may reduce their risk of asthma by up to 80 per cent, suggests new research. The cross-sectional survey of 690 children aged between seven and 18 on the Greek island of Crete found that high consumption of nuts, grapes, oranges and tomatoes was associated with 50, 81, 70, and 68 per cent reductions in wheezing, respectively. "Our findings indicate that a high dietary intake of commonly consumed fruits and vegetables and nuts may have a protective role on the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and allergic rhinitis," wrote lead author Leda Chatzi from the University of Crete. The Med diet, rich in cereals, wine, fruits, nuts, legumes and whole grains, fish and olive oil, has been linked to longer life, less heart disease, and protection against some cancers. The diet's main nutritional components include beta-carotene, vitamin C, tocopherols, polyphenols, and essential minerals.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Multivitamins pills may boost babys birth weight
Supplementation with multivitamins during pregnancy may boost the birth weight of newborns, and should be considered for all expectant mothers in developing countries, says a major clinical trial. "In light of these benefits and the low cost of the supplements, multivitamins should be considered for all pregnant women," wrote lead author Wafaie Fawzi in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research is of particular importance since an estimated 20 million children worldwide are born with low birth weight, defined as less than 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds), with over 95 per cent these in developing countries.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 3, 2007

Fat intake may cut vitamin C benefits for the stomach
Vitamin C may reduce the formation of potentially carcinogenic nitrogen-containing compounds in the stomach, offering protection from stomach cancer, researchers have reported.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Vitamin K may reverse arterial calcification – study
Arterial calcification, a process of hardening of the arteries, may be inhibited and even reversed with supplementation with high-dose vitamin K, suggests an animal study.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

March 29, 2007

Zinc pills may cut infections in the elderly
A daily zinc supplement may significantly reduce infections in the elderly, says a new trial from the US that may have implications for boosting "healthy ageing".
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

Green tea 'may keep HIV at bay'
Drinking green tea could help in the fight against HIV, research suggests. Scientists found a component called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) prevents HIV from binding to immune system cells by getting there first. Once EGCG has bound to immune system cells there is no room for HIV to take hold in its usual fashion.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

March 28, 2007

Choline May Support the Health of Cystic Fibrosis Patients
Supplementing with choline may help correct defects in homocysteine metabolism observed in cystic fibrosis patients, a new study has found.
Read article at vrp.com

March 27, 2007

Vitamin D, calcium, dairy linked to lower colon cancer risk
High intake of vitamin D and calcium from the diet and supplements may cut the risk of colorectal cancer by over 30 per cent, suggests a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 26, 2007

Blueberries fight bowel cancer
A compound in blueberries may be good for preventing bowel cancer, US scientists believe. The key ingredient, pterostilbene, is a natural antioxidant and mops up highly reactive molecules called free radicals that can trigger cancer growth. Similar antioxidants have already been identified in grapes and red wine, the American Chemical Society heard. Other work, also in mice, suggests pterostilbene may be good for lowering blood cholesterol too. The researchers, from Rutgers University and the US Department of Agriculture, suggest the compound could be put into a pill.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

March 21, 2007

Low-dose omega-3 linked to lower blood pressure
Low doses of the omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) successfully reduced diastolic blood pressure by 3.3 mmHg in a clinical trial, backing up previous results with higher doses. "A significant reduction in diastolic BP was noted which is likely to be of clinical significance with regard to risk of future vascular events in middle-aged subjects," wrote lead author Hannah Theobald from King's College London.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 20, 2007

Vitamin D again linked to lower breast cancer risk
Increased vitamin D levels during youth, from the sun and the diet, may reduce the risk of breast cancer later in life by over 30 per cent, suggests a new epidemiological study. The study, by researchers from the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Canada, adds to a rapidly growing body of science reporting potential benefits of the vitamin against cancer that has led for strong calls to increase recommended intake levels. The link between vitamin D intake and protection from cancer dates from the 1940s when Frank Apperly demonstrated a link between latitude and deaths from cancer, and suggested that sunlight gave "a relative cancer immunity."
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 16, 2007

Zinc supplements may cut deaths among low-income kids
Daily zinc supplements reduced the risk of death among children aged 12 to 48 months by 18 per cent, says a clinical trial set in Zanzibar. The study, published in the new issue of The Lancet, adds further evidence to the immune boosting properties of the element, with other trials also showing reduced frequency of pneumonia and diarrhoea in low-income settings. "This large trial demonstrates that the benefits of zinc supplementation include mortality reduction in addition to the reduction in cases of pneumonia, diarrhoea and malaria that we found in previous trials," said senior author Robert Black from at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 14, 2007

Green tea may help battle cancer
New evidence for green tea's anticancer effects have been reported by scientists who have carried out tests on lung cancer cells. The team found that an extract of the tea is able to restore a key protein, called actin, which becomes disrupted in cancer, helping to repair the damage.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: Further evidence that Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki have been right all along .

March 13, 2007

Garlic plus vitamin C may reduce blood pressure
A combination of garlic supplements and vitamin C reduced blood pressure back to normal levels in people with mildly elevated levels, says a pilot study. "Combinations of garlic and vitamin C are an effective alternative in the control of marginally high blood pressure," wrote authors Adam Mousa and Shaker Mousa in the journal Nutrition Research (Elsevier). "Garlic ingredients or garlic extract alone increased endothelial cell NO production, an effect that was shown to be enhanced by the combination with antioxidant vitamins," they said.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

March 12, 2007

Supplement 'boosts' brain power
A supplement containing fatty acids may help children do better at school. Tests of VegEPA, in four overweight youngsters, showed improvement in reading, concentration, and memory. Brain scans showed three years worth of development in just three months in the children, says Imperial College researcher Professor Basant Puri.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

Cocoa 'vitamin' health benefits could outshine penicillin
The health benefits of epicatechin, a compound found in cocoa, are so striking that it may rival penicillin and anaesthesia in terms of importance to public health, reports Marina Murphy in Chemistry & Industry, the magazine of the SCI. Norman Hollenberg, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told C&I that epicatechin is so important that it should be considered a vitamin.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki have long realized the health benefits of epicatechin and have been utilizing it in their published research since 2002.

March 9, 2007

Omega-3 may build grey matter, study
A study presented this week proposes a mechanism by which omega-3 intake could have a bearing on a person's mood and outlook.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

March 8, 2007

Omega-3s boost bone mass in young men – study
Increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are linked to increased bone build up in young men, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 7, 2007

Alpha-Lipoic Acid Guards Against Metabolic Syndrome
A recent review of the medical literature has concluded that alpha-lipoic acid can help alleviate the cluster of symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome.
Read article at vrp.com

Selenium Boosts Immunity in HIV Patients
A new human trial has found that selenium decreases HIV viral load and increases levels of beneficial immune cells.
Read article at vrp.com

March 5, 2007

Fish Oil Favorably Linked to Diabetes
High doses of fish oil reduced the size and concentration of several lipoprotein subclasses in type II diabetes patients while lowering patients’ insulin sensitivity according to study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Read article at naturalproductsinsider.com

February 23, 2007

Vitamin D: Cheap Wonder Drug?
It seems too simple to be true: Expose most of your body to about 15 minutes of sunlight a day during the summer and take large doses of inexpensive vitamin D pills during the winter and maybe, just maybe, you will substantially reduce the risk of getting various cancers, the flu, diabetes, heart disease, autoimmune diseases and neurological disorders. A flurry of research in the last few years suggests that low levels of vitamin D, a fairly common occurrence in those who live in northern locales much of the year, may be partly to blame for much of the ill health of many Americans.
Read article in LEF Daily News

Omega-3 again linked to lower colorectal cancer risk
Increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids may cut the risk of colorectal cancer in men by a whopping 66 per cent, but only in men not taking aspirin, suggests new research.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

More evidence that vitamin D may cut falls amongst the elderly
A daily vitamin D supplement of 800IU may cut the number of falls among nursing home-dwelling elderly people by 70 per cent, says a new study. The results of the randomized, multiple-dose study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, did not show a dose-dependent dose, but at the highest dose (800 mg) only 20 per cent of the group suffered falls, compared to 44 per cent in the placebo group. "Ensuring that nursing home residents are receiving adequate daily supplemental vitamin D may reduce the number of falls in elderly nursing home residents and could potentially reduce the risk of fracture in this high-risk group," wrote lead author Kerry Broe from the Institute of Aging and Boston-based Hebrew SeniorLife.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 22, 2007

Prenatal vitamins cuts kids' cancer risk
A new study has found that several hundred children a year in Canada could be spared devastating forms of cancer if women who are pregnant or trying to conceive take a multivitamin fortified with folic acid. The Canadian research is believed to be the largest of its kind ever undertaken. It shows that expectant women who take the supplement during the first trimester of pregnancy can lower the risk of leukemia, brain tumours or neuroblastoma by as much as 47 per cent.
Read article at canada.com

February 20, 2007

Selenium may protect against artery furring
Selenium supplements may reduce the risk of heart disease by inhibiting the oxidation of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, suggests a small study from Italy. Writing in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases the Italian researchers report that 14 healthy subjects taking a daily selenium supplement did not experience significant increases in oxidatively modified LDL, compared to a two per cent increase observed prior to supplementation. Such results could favourably reduce the risk of heart disease as oxidative modification of LDL has been reported to be a major part of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and subsequently cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 15, 2007

Vitamin K2 may maintain bone strength – study
Daily supplements of vitamin K2 maintained hipbone strength in postmenopausal women, while placebo led to weakening, says a study from the Netherlands. The double-blind, placebo controlled study, by researchers at Maastricht University's VitaK and the Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), followed 325 healthy women with no osteoporosis for three years and also found that vitamin K2 supplements boosted the women's bone mineral content (BMC), compared to placebo.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Vitamin A-rich diet may halve stomach cancer risk
A diet rich in vitamin A (retinol) may cut the risk of stomach cancer by 44 per cent, suggests a prospective study from Sweden. The study, which analysed dietary data from over 36,000 women and 45,000 men, also reported that similar risk reductions are obtained from high dietary intake of both alpha- and beta-carotene. "High intakes of vitamin A, retinol, and provitamin A carotenoids may reduce the risk of gastric cancer," wrote lead author Susanna Larsson from the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 13, 2007

Lifelong selenium intake may slow age-related cognitive decline
Low levels of selenium throughout life have been linked to lower cognitive function, says an epidemiological study from China. The epidemiological study, published in the current issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, could help further increase public awareness of a mineral already associated with reducing the risk of prostate and lung cancer, as well as boosting the immune system. Cognitive performance declines naturally with age, but the results of the longitudinal study suggest that this increased long-term selenium intake may slow this decline.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 12, 2007

Vitamin B12 linked to slower mental decline
Increased levels of vitamin B12, but not folate, may reduce the rate of age-related cognitive decline and dementia, suggests a new study. The research, led by Mary Haan from the University of Michigan, followed 1405 older Mexican Americans and found that increased levels of the amino acid homocysteine doubled the risk of dementia or cognitive impairment. Higher levels of vitamin B12 were associated with lower homocysteine levels, adding to previous studies reporting that B12 may be the more important than the other B vitamins for determining homocysteine levels and subsequently the risk of dementia.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

Calcium, vitamin D may reduce stress fracture risk
Daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D, long linked to improving bone health, may also reduce the risk of stress fractures during exercise, scientists have reported. The results, presented yesterday at the 53rd annual Orthopaedic Research Society meeting in San Diego , were obtained from a randomized, double-blind study with 5,201 female U.S. Navy recruits during eight weeks of basic training. “What really surprised us is that calcium/vitamin D supplements made a significant difference in such a short period of time. Frankly, we were not sure we would see any statistically significant results in only eight weeks,” said lead researcher Joan Lappe from Creighton University in Omaha.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 6, 2007

Raising vitamin D intake could lower breast, colorectal cancer risk
Increasing the daily intake of vitamin D to 2000 International Units could halve the risk of developing breast and colorectal cancer, two studies have reported. The results, from the same group of researchers from a variety of research institutions, are based on a pooled analysis and meta-analysis of studies, and may increase pressure on decision makers to increase the recommended daily intake of the vitamin.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 5, 2007

Selenium plus multivitamins may slash prostate cancer risk
Increased selenium intake in combination with a daily multivitamin may reduce the risk of prostate cancer by about 40 per cent, suggests new research. Similar risk reductions were also observed for people with high vitamin E levels, and amongst smokers.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Vitamins 'benefit divers' health'
Vitamin doses can reduce ill-effects of scuba diving on divers' circulation, a study suggests. The scientists from Croatia and Norway gave vitamins C and E, which work as antioxidants, to divers, the Journal of Physiology reported. The vitamins stopped ill-effects of the dive on the cells lining blood vessels, which can lead to high blood pressure and other associated diving problems.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

February 2, 2007

Selenium supplements could slow age-related cognitive decline
The decline of mental function that naturally occurs with age may be increased by falling selenium levels, suggests new research from France. The epidemiological study, published in the current issue of the journal Epidemiology, could help further increase public awareness of a mineral already associated with reducing the risk of prostate and lung cancer, as well as boosting the immune system. Cognitive performance declines naturally with age, but the results of the longitudinal study suggest that this may be slowed by selenium supplementation.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Review supports chromium picolinate’s diabetes benefits
Chromium picolinate as a nutritional supplement for diabetics does have a significant positive effect on blood sugar, insulin, and cholesterol levels, says a new review.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 31, 2007

Omega-3 and joint health – more support
Daily high-dose omega-3 supplements were found to decrease the severity of symptoms associated with ankylosing spondylitis, a chronic disease that mainly affects joints of the spine and hips. The study adds to an ever-growing body of science linking the marine fatty acids to improved joint health, in addition to a wide-range of health benefits, including cardiovascular health, good development of a baby during pregnancy, behaviour and mood, and certain cancers.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

January 30, 2007

Magnesium for teenagers may boost bone health
Magnesium supplements during adolescence, a key time for bone formation, boosted bone health in 120 girls in the US - research that suggests the mineral could have long-term benefits.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 26, 2007

Folic acid linked to reduced cleft lip in infants
Folic acid supplements during early pregnancy could reduce the risk of cleft lip in infants by 33 per cent, says a new study from Norway. The results add to the well-established benefits of the vitamin that links folate deficiency in early pregnancy to increased risk of neural tube defects (NTD) – most commonly spina bifida and anencephaly – in infants.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 24, 2007

Vitamins C and E linked to lower kidney cancer risk
Increased intake of the antioxidant vitamins C and E could cut the risk of kidney cancer by 28 and 44 per cent, respectively, says a new study from Italy.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 23, 2007

Selenium may help lower HIV levels
Selenium supplements can slow the rise in virus levels in HIV-positive patients, which allows the number of beneficial CD4 immune cell to increase, according to results of a clinical trial supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.
Read article at ScientificAmerican.Com

An Old Cholesterol Remedy Is New Again
Many scientists still believe that a statin combined with a drug that raises HDL would mark a significant advance in the treatment of heart disease. But for patients now at high risk of heart attack or stroke, the news is better than it sounds. An effective HDL booster already exists. It is niacin, the ordinary B vitamin.
Read article in New York Times (US)

January 19, 2007

Folic acid may slow cognitive decline in old age
Older people taking folic acid supplementation had improved memory and ability to process information, as well as a slower rate of age-related cognitive decline, says a study from the Netherlands. “In 818 older adults, daily oral folic acid supplementation for three years beneficially affected global cognitive function, and specifically memory, and information processing: functions that are sensitive to ageing,” wrote lead author Jane Durga in this week's issue of The Lancet.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 18, 2007

Human guinea pigs eat "ape diet" for 12 days, experience remarkable health improvements
Nine human beings in Devon, England, aged 36 to 49, agreed to be treated like animals for their health by living in a tent next to the ape house at Paignton Zoo and eating a strict diet akin to what our ancestors consumed. The experiment, which was filmed for television, was intended to show what happens when people abandon a modern diet filled with processed foods, according to organizer Jill Fullerton-Smith.
Read article at newstarget.com

Green Tea, The Elixir of Life?
Green tea, the everyday beverage for hundreds of millions in Japan and China, has emerged as the latest ‘miracle drug' for preventing just about any ailment humans can suffer from. Unlike patented medicines, green tea has no toxic or harmful side effects, not surprisingly, as its use goes back thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of years. It is cheap and widely available, and if the avalanche of scientific evidence proves right, it could do more than anything else to deliver health to the nation. So why aren't governments in the industrialised nations encouraging people to drink green tea for health?
Read article on the Institute of Science in Society website (UK)

January 17, 2007

Calcium offers prolonged protection from colorectal cancer, says study
The potential protective effects of calcium supplements against colorectal cancer may carry on for five years after people stop taking the supplements, research has revealed. The Calcium Follow-up Study, an observational study that followed the Calcium Polyp Prevention Study, found that people from the original calcium supplementation group had a significant 12 per cent lower risk of any adenoma five years after the original supplements were stopped, compared to people from the placebo group.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 12, 2007

Experts call for vitamin D level hike
The tolerable upper intake level for oral vitamin D3 should be increased five-fold, experts from the US-based Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) has said after a review of the science.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

FDA OKs vitamin C trial for cancer
Federal approval of a clinical trial on intravenous vitamin C as a cancer treatment lends credence to alternative cancer care, U.S. researchers said. Cancer Treatment Centers of America said it won Food and Drug Administration approval to begin the trial, a move the Illinois-based hospital group said adds credibility to its research into alternative methods for cancer medical care, the Chicago Tribune said Thursday. It is the first FDA-approved trial for CTCA.
Read article at physorg.com

January 10, 2007

Diet and fitness 'changed pupils'
The behaviour of children with special needs showed "significant improvement" with a good diet and regular exercise, a report has found. Pupils at Cricket Green School in south-west London , were put on a regime of multi-vitamins, healthy food and physical training. After seven months, teachers saw a drop in restlessness, anxiety, aches and pains - and better concentration. The study suggests there is a clear link between nutrition and learning.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

January 9, 2007

Vitamin D, Calcium Aid in Weight Loss
Researchers from Laval University observed the effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on weight loss in 63 women randomly assigned 600 mg elemental calcium and200 IU vitamin D tablets or placebo daily. All subjects then participated in a 15-week weight loss intervention program. At the conclusion of the intervention, significantlygreater decreases in total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and the LDL-to-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio were observed inthe calcium/vitamin D group compared to the placebo group.
Read article at NaturalProductsInsider.com (US)

January 03, 2007

Folic acid may prevent age-related hearing loss
Supplements of folic acid may prevent age-related hearing loss in older men and women, says a new double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial from the Netherlands . The study, published in the new issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, followed 728 men and women between the ages of 50 and 70 randomly assigned to receive either a folic acid supplement (800 micrograms per day) or placebo for three years. Lead author Jane Durga and her colleagues from Wageningen University and Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences, and University Hospital Maastricht, reported that the folic acid-supplemented group exhibited lower age-related hearing loss in the low frequency region.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

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